Informed consent for epidural analgesia in labour: a survey of Irish practice

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/322897
Title:
Informed consent for epidural analgesia in labour: a survey of Irish practice
Authors:
Hegarty, A; Omer, W; Harmon, D
Citation:
Hegarty A, Omar W, Harmon D. Informed consent for epidural analgesia in labour: a survey of Irish practice. IMJ. 2014 Jun 107(6)
Publisher:
Irish Medical Journal
Journal:
Irish Medical Journal
Issue Date:
Jun-2014
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/322897
Abstract:
Currently, we do not have a national standard regarding epidural consent in Ireland. The aim of this survey was to assess practice in obstetric units in Ireland with regard to obtaining informed consent prior to epidural insertion, and whether the risks discussed with women are being documented. A postal survey of anaesthetists in Irish obstetric units was performed in January 2012 to assess practice regarding obtaining informed consent prior to epidural insertion, and documentation of the risks discussed. The response rate was 16/18 (88%). There was major variation both in which risks are discussed with women in labour and what risks are quoted. The most frequently quoted risks were headache - 15/16 (93.8% of the respondents), partially/not working epidural - 15/16 (93.8%), drop in blood pressure -14/16 (87.5%) and temporary backache/local tenderness - 12/16 (75%). The more serious risks were not discussed as frequently: permanent nerve damage - 8/16 (50%), paralysis - 8/16 (50%), epidural abscess/haematoma - 6/16 (37.5%), meningitis - 3/16 (18.7%). The vast majority of respondents supported introduction of a national standardised information leaflet, detailing all the benefits and risks of epidural analgesia, to be shown to all women before consenting to epidural insertion.
Item Type:
Article
Language:
en
Keywords:
CHILDBIRTH; ANALGESIC
Local subject classification:
ANALGESIA, EPIDURAL

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorHegarty, Aen_GB
dc.contributor.authorOmer, Wen_GB
dc.contributor.authorHarmon, Den_GB
dc.date.accessioned2014-07-15T09:48:56Z-
dc.date.available2014-07-15T09:48:56Z-
dc.date.issued2014-06-
dc.identifier.citationHegarty A, Omar W, Harmon D. Informed consent for epidural analgesia in labour: a survey of Irish practice. IMJ. 2014 Jun 107(6)en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/322897-
dc.description.abstractCurrently, we do not have a national standard regarding epidural consent in Ireland. The aim of this survey was to assess practice in obstetric units in Ireland with regard to obtaining informed consent prior to epidural insertion, and whether the risks discussed with women are being documented. A postal survey of anaesthetists in Irish obstetric units was performed in January 2012 to assess practice regarding obtaining informed consent prior to epidural insertion, and documentation of the risks discussed. The response rate was 16/18 (88%). There was major variation both in which risks are discussed with women in labour and what risks are quoted. The most frequently quoted risks were headache - 15/16 (93.8% of the respondents), partially/not working epidural - 15/16 (93.8%), drop in blood pressure -14/16 (87.5%) and temporary backache/local tenderness - 12/16 (75%). The more serious risks were not discussed as frequently: permanent nerve damage - 8/16 (50%), paralysis - 8/16 (50%), epidural abscess/haematoma - 6/16 (37.5%), meningitis - 3/16 (18.7%). The vast majority of respondents supported introduction of a national standardised information leaflet, detailing all the benefits and risks of epidural analgesia, to be shown to all women before consenting to epidural insertion.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherIrish Medical Journalen_GB
dc.subjectCHILDBIRTHen_GB
dc.subjectANALGESICen_GB
dc.subject.otherANALGESIA, EPIDURALen_GB
dc.titleInformed consent for epidural analgesia in labour: a survey of Irish practiceen_GB
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalIrish Medical Journalen_GB
dc.description.fundingNo fundingen
dc.description.provinceMunsteren
dc.description.peer-reviewpeer-reviewen
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