The iceberg of suicide and self-harm in Irish adolescents: a population-based study

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/322287
Title:
The iceberg of suicide and self-harm in Irish adolescents: a population-based study
Authors:
McMahon, Elaine M.; Keeley, Helen; Cannon, Mary; Arensman, Ella; Perry, Ivan J.; Clarke, Mary; Chambers, Derek; Corcoran, Paul
Citation:
The iceberg of suicide and self-harm in Irish adolescents: a population-based study 2014 Social Psychiatry and Psychiatric Epidemiology
Publisher:
Social Psychiatry and Psychiatric Epidemiology
Journal:
Social Psychiatry and Psychiatric Epidemiology
Issue Date:
Jun-2014
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/322287
DOI:
10.1007/s00127-014-0907-z
Additional Links:
http://link.springer.com/10.1007/s00127-014-0907-z
Item Type:
Article
Language:
en
Description:
Suicide is a leading cause of death among adolescents. Self-harm is the most important risk factor for suicide, yet the majority of self-harm does not come to the attention of health services. The purpose of this study was to establish the relative incidence of adolescent suicide, hospital-treated self-harm and self-harm in the community. Methods Annual suicide rates were calculated for 15–17 year-old in the Cork and Kerry region in Ireland based on data from the Central Statistics Office. Rates of hospital-treated self-harm were collected by the Irish National Registry of Deliberate Self-Harm. Rates of self-harm in the community were assessed using a survey of 3,881 adolescents, the Child and Adolescent Self-harm in Europe study. Results The annual suicide rate was 10/100,000. Suicide was six times more common among boys than girls. The annual incidence rate of hospital-treated self-harm was approximately 344/100,000, with the female rate almost twice the male rate. The rate of self-harm in the community was 5,551/100,000, and girls were almost four times more likely to report self-harm. For every boy who died by suicide, 16 presented to hospital with self-harm and 146 reported self-harm in the community. For every female suicide, 162 girls presented to hospital with self-harm and 3,296 reported self-harm. Conclusions Gender differences in relative rates of self-harm and suicide are very large, with boys who have harmed themselves at particularly high risk of suicide. Knowledge of the relative incidence of self-harm and suicide in adolescents can inform prevention programmes and services.
Keywords:
SUICIDE; ADOLESCENCE; SELF HARM
ISSN:
0933-7954; 1433-9285

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorMcMahon, Elaine M.en_GB
dc.contributor.authorKeeley, Helenen_GB
dc.contributor.authorCannon, Maryen_GB
dc.contributor.authorArensman, Ellaen_GB
dc.contributor.authorPerry, Ivan J.en_GB
dc.contributor.authorClarke, Maryen_GB
dc.contributor.authorChambers, Dereken_GB
dc.contributor.authorCorcoran, Paulen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2014-06-30T09:30:36Z-
dc.date.available2014-06-30T09:30:36Z-
dc.date.issued2014-06-
dc.identifier.citationThe iceberg of suicide and self-harm in Irish adolescents: a population-based study 2014 Social Psychiatry and Psychiatric Epidemiologyen_GB
dc.identifier.issn0933-7954-
dc.identifier.issn1433-9285-
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s00127-014-0907-z-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/322287-
dc.descriptionSuicide is a leading cause of death among adolescents. Self-harm is the most important risk factor for suicide, yet the majority of self-harm does not come to the attention of health services. The purpose of this study was to establish the relative incidence of adolescent suicide, hospital-treated self-harm and self-harm in the community. Methods Annual suicide rates were calculated for 15–17 year-old in the Cork and Kerry region in Ireland based on data from the Central Statistics Office. Rates of hospital-treated self-harm were collected by the Irish National Registry of Deliberate Self-Harm. Rates of self-harm in the community were assessed using a survey of 3,881 adolescents, the Child and Adolescent Self-harm in Europe study. Results The annual suicide rate was 10/100,000. Suicide was six times more common among boys than girls. The annual incidence rate of hospital-treated self-harm was approximately 344/100,000, with the female rate almost twice the male rate. The rate of self-harm in the community was 5,551/100,000, and girls were almost four times more likely to report self-harm. For every boy who died by suicide, 16 presented to hospital with self-harm and 146 reported self-harm in the community. For every female suicide, 162 girls presented to hospital with self-harm and 3,296 reported self-harm. Conclusions Gender differences in relative rates of self-harm and suicide are very large, with boys who have harmed themselves at particularly high risk of suicide. Knowledge of the relative incidence of self-harm and suicide in adolescents can inform prevention programmes and services.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherSocial Psychiatry and Psychiatric Epidemiologyen_GB
dc.relation.urlhttp://link.springer.com/10.1007/s00127-014-0907-zen_GB
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Social Psychiatry and Psychiatric Epidemiologyen_GB
dc.subjectSUICIDEen_GB
dc.subjectADOLESCENCEen_GB
dc.subjectSELF HARMen_GB
dc.titleThe iceberg of suicide and self-harm in Irish adolescents: a population-based studyen_GB
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalSocial Psychiatry and Psychiatric Epidemiologyen_GB
All Items in Lenus, The Irish Health Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.