A randomized controlled trial of the computerized CBT programme, MoodGYM, for public mental health service users waiting for interventions

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/321806
Title:
A randomized controlled trial of the computerized CBT programme, MoodGYM, for public mental health service users waiting for interventions
Authors:
Twomey, Conal; O'Reilly, Gary; Byrne, Michael ( 0000-0002-1675-9850 ) ; Bury, Matthew; White, Aisling; Kissane, Sheila; McMahon, Aisling; Clancy, Nicola
Affiliation:
School of Psychology, University College Dublin, Ireland
Citation:
Twomey, C., O’Reilly, G., Byrne, M., Bury, M., White, A., Kissane, S., McMahon, A. & Clancy, N. (2014). A randomised controlled trial of the computerised CBT programme MoodGYM for public mental health service clients waiting for interventions. British Journal of Clinical Psychology, 53, 433-450. Available on doi: 10.1111/bjc.12055
Publisher:
British Journal of Clinical Psychology
Journal:
British Journal of Clinical Psychology
Issue Date:
May-2014
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/321806
DOI:
10.1111/bjc.12055; doi: 10.1111/bjc.12055
Additional Links:
http://doi.wiley.com/10.1111/bjc.12055
Item Type:
Article
Language:
en
Description:
Objectives. To evaluate the effectiveness of the computerized CBT (cCBT) programme, MoodGYM, for the reduction in symptoms of general psychological distress (the primary outcome), depression, anxiety, stress, and impaired daily functioning. Design. A randomized controlled trial, with a waiting list control condition, in a routine clinical setting. Methods. Participants were 149 public mental health service users (aged 18 – 61 [ M = 35.3 years; SD = 10.3]) waiting for interventions. Self-report outcome measures were administered online at baseline and post-intervention (i.e., after 32 days). Results. After high dropout rates, a post-intervention completers analysis examined 28 MoodGYM participants and 38 waiting list control participants. MoodGYM was significantly more effective than the waiting list control for the reduction of symptoms of general psychological distress ( F [1, 64] = 4.45; p < .05) and stress ( F [1, 64] = 5.35; p < .05) but not depression, anxiety, or impaired daily functioning. Conclusions. Due to their high associated dropout rates, self-help cCBT programmes such as MoodGYM should not be provided as front-line treatments. However, as it is likely to be agreeable and beneficial to some service users, perhaps self-help cCBT should be provided as an additional treatment option.
Keywords:
PSYCHOTHERAPY; COMMUNITY MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES
Local subject classification:
COGNITIVE BEHAVIOURAL THERAPY
ISSN:
01446657

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorTwomey, Conalen_GB
dc.contributor.authorO'Reilly, Garyen_GB
dc.contributor.authorByrne, Michaelen_GB
dc.contributor.authorBury, Matthewen_GB
dc.contributor.authorWhite, Aislingen_GB
dc.contributor.authorKissane, Sheilaen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMcMahon, Aislingen_GB
dc.contributor.authorClancy, Nicolaen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2014-06-18T10:25:07Z-
dc.date.available2014-06-18T10:25:07Z-
dc.date.issued2014-05-
dc.identifier.citationTwomey, C., O’Reilly, G., Byrne, M., Bury, M., White, A., Kissane, S., McMahon, A. & Clancy, N. (2014). A randomised controlled trial of the computerised CBT programme MoodGYM for public mental health service clients waiting for interventions. British Journal of Clinical Psychology, 53, 433-450. Available on doi: 10.1111/bjc.12055en_GB
dc.identifier.issn01446657-
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/bjc.12055-
dc.identifier.doidoi: 10.1111/bjc.12055-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/321806-
dc.descriptionObjectives. To evaluate the effectiveness of the computerized CBT (cCBT) programme, MoodGYM, for the reduction in symptoms of general psychological distress (the primary outcome), depression, anxiety, stress, and impaired daily functioning. Design. A randomized controlled trial, with a waiting list control condition, in a routine clinical setting. Methods. Participants were 149 public mental health service users (aged 18 – 61 [ M = 35.3 years; SD = 10.3]) waiting for interventions. Self-report outcome measures were administered online at baseline and post-intervention (i.e., after 32 days). Results. After high dropout rates, a post-intervention completers analysis examined 28 MoodGYM participants and 38 waiting list control participants. MoodGYM was significantly more effective than the waiting list control for the reduction of symptoms of general psychological distress ( F [1, 64] = 4.45; p < .05) and stress ( F [1, 64] = 5.35; p < .05) but not depression, anxiety, or impaired daily functioning. Conclusions. Due to their high associated dropout rates, self-help cCBT programmes such as MoodGYM should not be provided as front-line treatments. However, as it is likely to be agreeable and beneficial to some service users, perhaps self-help cCBT should be provided as an additional treatment option.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherBritish Journal of Clinical Psychologyen_GB
dc.relation.urlhttp://doi.wiley.com/10.1111/bjc.12055en_GB
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to British Journal of Clinical Psychologyen_GB
dc.subjectPSYCHOTHERAPYen_GB
dc.subjectCOMMUNITY MENTAL HEALTH SERVICESen_GB
dc.subject.otherCOGNITIVE BEHAVIOURAL THERAPYen_GB
dc.titleA randomized controlled trial of the computerized CBT programme, MoodGYM, for public mental health service users waiting for interventionsen_GB
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentSchool of Psychology, University College Dublin, Irelanden_GB
dc.identifier.journalBritish Journal of Clinical Psychologyen_GB
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