Headaches, neurologists and the emergency department

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/321781
Title:
Headaches, neurologists and the emergency department
Authors:
Gaughran, G; Tubridy, N
Citation:
Gaughran G, Tubridy N. Headaches, neurologists and the emergency department. Ir Med J 2014 107(6) June
Publisher:
Irish Medical Journal
Journal:
Irish Medical Journal
Issue Date:
Jun-2014
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/321781
Abstract:
This study explores the claim that headache management can be improved by evaluating current emergent care. A retrospective chart review investigated primary complaints of headache during a three-month period. Two hundred and twenty seven patients were identified for review and three-month follow-up using fully available records and imaging. A total of 543/8,759 had a neurological condition. The most common conditions were headaches (42% or 227 cases), cerebrovascular problems (26%) and seizures (17%). No ’usual headache’ patterns showed abnormal imaging. In contrast, those with ’sudden-onset’ type or clinical findings had an abnormal scan 17% of the time. Of the MRIs ordered, one-quarter changed management. On discharge, 39% of patients left without a specific headache diagnosis. In the discussion, we evaluate how well a tertiary referral ED treats its most common neurological complaint, focusing on the controversial topics of when to investigate and prevention of re-attendance.
Item Type:
Article
Language:
en
Keywords:
NEUROLOGY; EMERGENCY MEDICAL CARE
Local subject classification:
HEADACHE

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorGaughran, Gen_GB
dc.contributor.authorTubridy, Nen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2014-06-18T09:09:17Z-
dc.date.available2014-06-18T09:09:17Z-
dc.date.issued2014-06-
dc.identifier.citationGaughran G, Tubridy N. Headaches, neurologists and the emergency department. Ir Med J 2014 107(6) Juneen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/321781-
dc.description.abstractThis study explores the claim that headache management can be improved by evaluating current emergent care. A retrospective chart review investigated primary complaints of headache during a three-month period. Two hundred and twenty seven patients were identified for review and three-month follow-up using fully available records and imaging. A total of 543/8,759 had a neurological condition. The most common conditions were headaches (42% or 227 cases), cerebrovascular problems (26%) and seizures (17%). No ’usual headache’ patterns showed abnormal imaging. In contrast, those with ’sudden-onset’ type or clinical findings had an abnormal scan 17% of the time. Of the MRIs ordered, one-quarter changed management. On discharge, 39% of patients left without a specific headache diagnosis. In the discussion, we evaluate how well a tertiary referral ED treats its most common neurological complaint, focusing on the controversial topics of when to investigate and prevention of re-attendance.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherIrish Medical Journalen_GB
dc.subjectNEUROLOGYen_GB
dc.subjectEMERGENCY MEDICAL CAREen_GB
dc.subject.otherHEADACHEen_GB
dc.titleHeadaches, neurologists and the emergency departmenten_GB
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalIrish Medical Journalen_GB
dc.description.fundingNo fundingen
dc.description.provinceLeinsteren
dc.description.peer-reviewpeer-reviewen
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