Beliefs, perceptions and behaviours of GPs towards generic medicines

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/321284
Title:
Beliefs, perceptions and behaviours of GPs towards generic medicines
Authors:
Dunne, S. S.; Shannon, B.; Cullen, W.; Dunne, C. P.
Citation:
Dunne SS et al. Beliefs, perceptions and behaviours of GPs towards generic medicines. Family Practice 2014: First published online: June 3, 2014
Publisher:
Family Practice
Journal:
Family Practice
Issue Date:
Jun-2014
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/321284
DOI:
10.1093/fampra/cmu024
Additional Links:
http://www.fampra.oxfordjournals.org/cgi/doi/10.1093/fampra/cmu024
Item Type:
Article
Language:
en
Description:
Background. To benefit from cost-savings associated with generic medicine use; in June 2013, Ireland introduced generic substitution and reference pricing. The attitudes and behaviours of health care professionals may influence successful implementation of such changes. Objectives. To assess perceptions of GPs in Ireland regarding generic medicines in the time leading up to the enactment of the new legislation and for the first time in at least the prior decade. Methods. Detailed one-to-one semi-structured interviews performed with a representative cohort of 34 urban- and rural-based GPs in Ireland. Results. Thirty of the participating 34 GPs prescribed generic medicines actively. Predominantly, participants believed that generics worked as effectively, and were of the same quality, as originator medicines. However, 32 GPs reported receiving patient complaints regarding generics; almost a third reported complaints of increased or altered side effects. Thirty-two GPs stated that they would take a generic medicine, although one in seven would choose the originator if offered a choice. A minority of GPs were of the view that generics are manufactured to a poorer quality than originators and may be a risk to patient safety. Conclusion. This study of GPs’ attitudes towards generic medicines in Ireland highlights that this key stakeholder group has generally positive attitudes towards both generic medicines and the new legislation. However, variable knowledge about generic medicines and concerns regarding patient experience, clinical effectiveness and manufacturing quality were identified. GPs’ opinions could negatively influence patient opinions; enhancing such opinions may prove important in successfully implementing the new legislation.
Keywords:
GENERAL PRACTITIONER; MEDICINES
Local subject classification:
DRUGS, GENERIC
ISSN:
0263-2136; 1460-2229

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorDunne, S. S.en_GB
dc.contributor.authorShannon, B.en_GB
dc.contributor.authorCullen, W.en_GB
dc.contributor.authorDunne, C. P.en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2014-06-12T12:07:46Z-
dc.date.available2014-06-12T12:07:46Z-
dc.date.issued2014-06-
dc.identifier.citationDunne SS et al. Beliefs, perceptions and behaviours of GPs towards generic medicines. Family Practice 2014: First published online: June 3, 2014en_GB
dc.identifier.issn0263-2136-
dc.identifier.issn1460-2229-
dc.identifier.doi10.1093/fampra/cmu024-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/321284-
dc.descriptionBackground. To benefit from cost-savings associated with generic medicine use; in June 2013, Ireland introduced generic substitution and reference pricing. The attitudes and behaviours of health care professionals may influence successful implementation of such changes. Objectives. To assess perceptions of GPs in Ireland regarding generic medicines in the time leading up to the enactment of the new legislation and for the first time in at least the prior decade. Methods. Detailed one-to-one semi-structured interviews performed with a representative cohort of 34 urban- and rural-based GPs in Ireland. Results. Thirty of the participating 34 GPs prescribed generic medicines actively. Predominantly, participants believed that generics worked as effectively, and were of the same quality, as originator medicines. However, 32 GPs reported receiving patient complaints regarding generics; almost a third reported complaints of increased or altered side effects. Thirty-two GPs stated that they would take a generic medicine, although one in seven would choose the originator if offered a choice. A minority of GPs were of the view that generics are manufactured to a poorer quality than originators and may be a risk to patient safety. Conclusion. This study of GPs’ attitudes towards generic medicines in Ireland highlights that this key stakeholder group has generally positive attitudes towards both generic medicines and the new legislation. However, variable knowledge about generic medicines and concerns regarding patient experience, clinical effectiveness and manufacturing quality were identified. GPs’ opinions could negatively influence patient opinions; enhancing such opinions may prove important in successfully implementing the new legislation.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherFamily Practiceen_GB
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.fampra.oxfordjournals.org/cgi/doi/10.1093/fampra/cmu024en_GB
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Family Practiceen_GB
dc.subjectGENERAL PRACTITIONERen_GB
dc.subjectMEDICINESen_GB
dc.subject.otherDRUGS, GENERICen_GB
dc.titleBeliefs, perceptions and behaviours of GPs towards generic medicinesen_GB
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalFamily Practiceen_GB
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