Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/320705
Title:
Finding horse meat in beef products--a global problem.
Authors:
O'Mahony, P J
Affiliation:
Food Safety Authority of Ireland (FSAI)
Citation:
O'Mahony PJ. Finding horse meat in beef products--a global problem. QJM. 2013, 106 (6):595-7
Journal:
QJM : monthly journal of the Association of Physicians
Issue Date:
Jun-2013
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/320705
DOI:
10.1093/qjmed/hct087
PubMed ID:
23625529
Additional Links:
http://qjmed.oxfordjournals.org/content/106/6/595.full?keytype=ref&ijkey=RT4eul811q4gGHA
Abstract:
The Food Safety Authority of Ireland (FSAI) oversees the implementation of food safety controls in Ireland which are set out in EU and Irish law. The FSAI, a science-based consumer protection organization, has nurtured a close relationship with the scientific community allowing it to utilize the best scientific advice available to underpin risk assessments. In early 2013, a 2-month long investigation in to the authenticity of beef products culminated in the publication of results that demonstrated the presence of horse meat in a frozen burger produced in Ireland. The events that followed revealed a pan-European food fraud which will likely result in significant changes in the way this small section of the meat industry will be regulated in the future in the EU. Although revelations of implicated products and food businesses have relented, the EU-wide investigation is continuing in an effort to determine how a food fraud of this scale could have occurred in such a highly regulated industry and who was involved. The FSAI initially received some criticism after publication of the results, but was also commended for its scientific approach as well as its openness and transparency. The end result of this incident is likely to be that the complexity of the food chain will be addressed again and DNA-based or similar methods will become a regular feature in verifying the authenticity of meat-based foods.
Item Type:
Article
Language:
en
Description:
The Food Safety Authority of Ireland (FSAI) oversees the implementation of food safety controls in Ireland which are set out in EU and Irish law. The FSAI, a science-based consumer protection organization, has nurtured a close relationship with the scientific community allowing it to utilize the best scientific advice available to underpin risk assessments. In early 2013, a 2-month long investigation in to the authenticity of beef products culminated in the publication of results that demonstrated the presence of horse meat in a frozen burger produced in Ireland. The events that followed revealed a pan-European food fraud which will likely result in significant changes in the way this small section of the meat industry will be regulated in the future in the EU. Although revelations of implicated products and food businesses have relented, the EU-wide investigation is continuing in an effort to determine how a food fraud of this scale could have occurred in such a highly regulated industry and who was involved. The FSAI initially received some criticism after publication of the results, but was also commended for its scientific approach as well as its openness and transparency. The end result of this incident is likely to be that the complexity of the food chain will be addressed again and DNA-based or similar methods will become a regular feature in verifying the authenticity of meat-based foods.
Keywords:
FOOD SAFETY; FOOD REGULATIONS; FOOD LABELLING
Local subject classification:
FOOD FRAUD
MeSH:
Animals; Cattle; Consumer Product Safety; European Union; Food Contamination; Food Industry; Fraud; Horses; Humans; Meat Products
ISSN:
1460-2393

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorO'Mahony, P Jen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2014-06-11T09:31:10Z-
dc.date.available2014-06-11T09:31:10Z-
dc.date.issued2013-06-
dc.identifier.citationO'Mahony PJ. Finding horse meat in beef products--a global problem. QJM. 2013, 106 (6):595-7en_GB
dc.identifier.issn1460-2393-
dc.identifier.pmid23625529-
dc.identifier.doi10.1093/qjmed/hct087-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/320705-
dc.descriptionThe Food Safety Authority of Ireland (FSAI) oversees the implementation of food safety controls in Ireland which are set out in EU and Irish law. The FSAI, a science-based consumer protection organization, has nurtured a close relationship with the scientific community allowing it to utilize the best scientific advice available to underpin risk assessments. In early 2013, a 2-month long investigation in to the authenticity of beef products culminated in the publication of results that demonstrated the presence of horse meat in a frozen burger produced in Ireland. The events that followed revealed a pan-European food fraud which will likely result in significant changes in the way this small section of the meat industry will be regulated in the future in the EU. Although revelations of implicated products and food businesses have relented, the EU-wide investigation is continuing in an effort to determine how a food fraud of this scale could have occurred in such a highly regulated industry and who was involved. The FSAI initially received some criticism after publication of the results, but was also commended for its scientific approach as well as its openness and transparency. The end result of this incident is likely to be that the complexity of the food chain will be addressed again and DNA-based or similar methods will become a regular feature in verifying the authenticity of meat-based foods.en_GB
dc.description.abstractThe Food Safety Authority of Ireland (FSAI) oversees the implementation of food safety controls in Ireland which are set out in EU and Irish law. The FSAI, a science-based consumer protection organization, has nurtured a close relationship with the scientific community allowing it to utilize the best scientific advice available to underpin risk assessments. In early 2013, a 2-month long investigation in to the authenticity of beef products culminated in the publication of results that demonstrated the presence of horse meat in a frozen burger produced in Ireland. The events that followed revealed a pan-European food fraud which will likely result in significant changes in the way this small section of the meat industry will be regulated in the future in the EU. Although revelations of implicated products and food businesses have relented, the EU-wide investigation is continuing in an effort to determine how a food fraud of this scale could have occurred in such a highly regulated industry and who was involved. The FSAI initially received some criticism after publication of the results, but was also commended for its scientific approach as well as its openness and transparency. The end result of this incident is likely to be that the complexity of the food chain will be addressed again and DNA-based or similar methods will become a regular feature in verifying the authenticity of meat-based foods.-
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.urlhttp://qjmed.oxfordjournals.org/content/106/6/595.full?keytype=ref&ijkey=RT4eul811q4gGHAen_GB
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to QJM : monthly journal of the Association of Physiciansen_GB
dc.subjectFOOD SAFETYen_GB
dc.subjectFOOD REGULATIONSen_GB
dc.subjectFOOD LABELLINGen_GB
dc.subject.meshAnimals-
dc.subject.meshCattle-
dc.subject.meshConsumer Product Safety-
dc.subject.meshEuropean Union-
dc.subject.meshFood Contamination-
dc.subject.meshFood Industry-
dc.subject.meshFraud-
dc.subject.meshHorses-
dc.subject.meshHumans-
dc.subject.meshMeat Products-
dc.subject.otherFOOD FRAUDen_GB
dc.titleFinding horse meat in beef products--a global problem.en_GB
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentFood Safety Authority of Ireland (FSAI)en_GB
dc.identifier.journalQJM : monthly journal of the Association of Physiciansen_GB

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