Travelling with austerity - impacts of cuts on Travellers, Traveller projects and services

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/317653
Title:
Travelling with austerity - impacts of cuts on Travellers, Traveller projects and services
Authors:
Harvey, Brian
Citation:
Harvey B. Travelling with austerity - impacts of cuts on Travellers, Traveller projects and services. Dublin: Pavee Point; 2013
Publisher:
Pavee Point Travellers' Centre
Issue Date:
Apr-2013
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/317653
Item Type:
Report
Language:
en
Description:
Executive summary and key challenges This report follows the evolution of community development work with the Traveller community from the 1980s to the present day; examines the effect of austerity on the Traveller community in general and the community development work therein specifically; and looks at how community development work with Travellers may best be developed in the future. Four pen portraits of Traveller advocates are included. The period from the breaking of the economic and social crisis in 2008 has seen a dramatic disinvestment by the state in the Traveller community. Using the government’s own figures, it is possible to identify the scale of the austerity cuts, as follows, but they should be compared to the overall reduction in government current spending of -4.3% over 2008-2013, the baseline. Programmes for Travellers Interagency activities -100% Traveller education -86.6% Traveller accommodation -85% Equality -76.3% National Traveller organisations -63.6% FAS Special Initiative for Travellers -50% National Traveller Partnership -32.1% Traveller SPY youth projects -29.8% Health1 -5.4% Programmes and funding lines of importance to Travellers Equality and rights agencies -69% Local & Community Development Programme -42.3% Initiatives against drugs -32.5% One of the most striking aspects of these cuts was that statutory agencies did not even spend all their allocations, so the picture is even more difficult. This is a table of the proportions actually spent (and, conversely, the underspend): Spend Underspend Health 82% 18% Equality 72% 28% Accommodation 64% 36% FAS Special Initiative for Travellers 60% 40% The only exceptions to the pattern of cuts were the Traveller social economy programme and the National Traveller Money Advice and Budgeting Service, which show that it is possible to protect or even increase specific budget lines.These figures tell an egregious story of an extraordinary level of disinvestment by the Irish state in the Traveller community. One can think of no other section of the community which has suffered such a high level of withdrawal of funding and human resources, compounded by the failure of the state to spend even the limited resources that it has made available. The reductions in accommodation and education are especially impactful, granted the continued hardship faced by many Travellers on sites and in poor quality private rented accommodation, and granted the still-wide gap in educational opportunities between the Traveller and the settled community. Worrying reports are already coming through on the negative consequences for Travellers at school. In looking to the future, the report lays out the challenges for community development for the next years with Travellers. These are: The need to protect, preserve and extend the gains made by community development over the past thirty years, principally its model of development, the infrastructure of Traveller organisations that has built up and the leadership that has developed, training a new, younger generation that will enable the community to cope with the hardships inflicted by austerity, respond to them and emerge from them; The need to challenge and reverse the effects of the decisions taken, which have disproportionately affected the Traveller community, challenging those areas from where the state has retreated, such as anti – racism and inter - culturalism and the prevention of discrimination. The state continues to take decisions without consulting Travelling people, with Travellers unrepresented on high-level groups at national level and local level, contrary to European principles. The importance of making the strategies and the structures developed over the past decades work effectively, especially in such areas as health, accommodation, education, the labour market and enterprise; The need to address key political issues, notably recognition of the Traveller community as a minority ethnic group; amendment of the equal status legislation so as to make it a truly effective instrument against discrimination; interculturalism, especially in schools which are slow to address issues of culture and discrimination despite examples of some good initiatives; and the alignment process, which must preserve the independence of community development projects working with Travellers.
Keywords:
TRAVELLERS AND GYPSIES; SOCIAL EXCLUSION
ISBN:
1897598351

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorHarvey, Brianen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2014-05-30T10:59:27Z-
dc.date.available2014-05-30T10:59:27Z-
dc.date.issued2013-04-
dc.identifier.citationHarvey B. Travelling with austerity - impacts of cuts on Travellers, Traveller projects and services. Dublin: Pavee Point; 2013en_GB
dc.identifier.isbn1897598351-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/317653-
dc.descriptionExecutive summary and key challenges This report follows the evolution of community development work with the Traveller community from the 1980s to the present day; examines the effect of austerity on the Traveller community in general and the community development work therein specifically; and looks at how community development work with Travellers may best be developed in the future. Four pen portraits of Traveller advocates are included. The period from the breaking of the economic and social crisis in 2008 has seen a dramatic disinvestment by the state in the Traveller community. Using the government’s own figures, it is possible to identify the scale of the austerity cuts, as follows, but they should be compared to the overall reduction in government current spending of -4.3% over 2008-2013, the baseline. Programmes for Travellers Interagency activities -100% Traveller education -86.6% Traveller accommodation -85% Equality -76.3% National Traveller organisations -63.6% FAS Special Initiative for Travellers -50% National Traveller Partnership -32.1% Traveller SPY youth projects -29.8% Health1 -5.4% Programmes and funding lines of importance to Travellers Equality and rights agencies -69% Local & Community Development Programme -42.3% Initiatives against drugs -32.5% One of the most striking aspects of these cuts was that statutory agencies did not even spend all their allocations, so the picture is even more difficult. This is a table of the proportions actually spent (and, conversely, the underspend): Spend Underspend Health 82% 18% Equality 72% 28% Accommodation 64% 36% FAS Special Initiative for Travellers 60% 40% The only exceptions to the pattern of cuts were the Traveller social economy programme and the National Traveller Money Advice and Budgeting Service, which show that it is possible to protect or even increase specific budget lines.These figures tell an egregious story of an extraordinary level of disinvestment by the Irish state in the Traveller community. One can think of no other section of the community which has suffered such a high level of withdrawal of funding and human resources, compounded by the failure of the state to spend even the limited resources that it has made available. The reductions in accommodation and education are especially impactful, granted the continued hardship faced by many Travellers on sites and in poor quality private rented accommodation, and granted the still-wide gap in educational opportunities between the Traveller and the settled community. Worrying reports are already coming through on the negative consequences for Travellers at school. In looking to the future, the report lays out the challenges for community development for the next years with Travellers. These are: The need to protect, preserve and extend the gains made by community development over the past thirty years, principally its model of development, the infrastructure of Traveller organisations that has built up and the leadership that has developed, training a new, younger generation that will enable the community to cope with the hardships inflicted by austerity, respond to them and emerge from them; The need to challenge and reverse the effects of the decisions taken, which have disproportionately affected the Traveller community, challenging those areas from where the state has retreated, such as anti – racism and inter - culturalism and the prevention of discrimination. The state continues to take decisions without consulting Travelling people, with Travellers unrepresented on high-level groups at national level and local level, contrary to European principles. The importance of making the strategies and the structures developed over the past decades work effectively, especially in such areas as health, accommodation, education, the labour market and enterprise; The need to address key political issues, notably recognition of the Traveller community as a minority ethnic group; amendment of the equal status legislation so as to make it a truly effective instrument against discrimination; interculturalism, especially in schools which are slow to address issues of culture and discrimination despite examples of some good initiatives; and the alignment process, which must preserve the independence of community development projects working with Travellers.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherPavee Point Travellers' Centreen_GB
dc.subjectTRAVELLERS AND GYPSIESen_GB
dc.subjectSOCIAL EXCLUSIONen_GB
dc.titleTravelling with austerity - impacts of cuts on Travellers, Traveller projects and servicesen_GB
dc.typeReporten
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