Intracranial abscess secondary to dental infection

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/316725
Title:
Intracranial abscess secondary to dental infection
Authors:
Brady, Paul; Bergin, Sarah; Cryan, Bartley; Flanagan, Oisin
Citation:
Brady, Paul, Bergin, Sarah, Cryan, Bartley, Flanagan, Oisin. Intracranial abscess secondary to dental infection. Journal of the Irish Dental Association. March 2014.
Publisher:
Irish Dental Association
Journal:
Journal of the Irish Dental Association
Issue Date:
Mar-2014
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/316725
Abstract:
The oral cavity is considered as being home to a rich and abundant microflora, including Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans (A. ac tinomyc etemcomitans), which is recognised as one of the major pathogens in destructive periodontal disease.1 A cerebral abscess linked to a dental source is a rare occurrence, since in most individuals the blood-brain barrier, along with the immune response, will exclude bacteria. In this age of antibiotics and with modern living conditions, pyogenic brain infections of odontogenic origin are uncommon in western society. It has been postulated that oral microorganisms may enter the cranium by several pathways: 1) by direct extension, 2) by haematogenous spread, 3) by local lymphatics, and 4) indirectly, by extraoral odontogenic infection. Brain abscesses thought to be of dental origin have been reported to have a lethal outcome.2
Item Type:
Article
Language:
en
Keywords:
DENTAL HEALTH
Local subject classification:
ORAL CAVITY

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorBrady, Paulen_GB
dc.contributor.authorBergin, Sarahen_GB
dc.contributor.authorCryan, Bartleyen_GB
dc.contributor.authorFlanagan, Oisinen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2014-05-12T11:36:43Z-
dc.date.available2014-05-12T11:36:43Z-
dc.date.issued2014-03-
dc.identifier.citationBrady, Paul, Bergin, Sarah, Cryan, Bartley, Flanagan, Oisin. Intracranial abscess secondary to dental infection. Journal of the Irish Dental Association. March 2014.en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/316725-
dc.description.abstractThe oral cavity is considered as being home to a rich and abundant microflora, including Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans (A. ac tinomyc etemcomitans), which is recognised as one of the major pathogens in destructive periodontal disease.1 A cerebral abscess linked to a dental source is a rare occurrence, since in most individuals the blood-brain barrier, along with the immune response, will exclude bacteria. In this age of antibiotics and with modern living conditions, pyogenic brain infections of odontogenic origin are uncommon in western society. It has been postulated that oral microorganisms may enter the cranium by several pathways: 1) by direct extension, 2) by haematogenous spread, 3) by local lymphatics, and 4) indirectly, by extraoral odontogenic infection. Brain abscesses thought to be of dental origin have been reported to have a lethal outcome.2en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherIrish Dental Associationen_GB
dc.subjectDENTAL HEALTHen_GB
dc.subject.otherORAL CAVITYen_GB
dc.titleIntracranial abscess secondary to dental infectionen_GB
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalJournal of the Irish Dental Associationen_GB
dc.description.fundingNo fundingen
dc.description.provinceMunsteren
dc.description.peer-reviewpeer-reviewen
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