Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/316410
Title:
Child-friendly healthcare
Authors:
Kilkelly, Ursula; Savage, Eileen
Affiliation:
Faculty of Law, UCC and School of Nursing and Midwifery, UCC
Citation:
Kilkelly, Ursula; Savage, Eileen Child-friendly healthcare. Ombudsman for Children Office. Nov. 2013
Publisher:
Ombudsman for Children Office (OCO)
Issue Date:
Nov-2013
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/316410
Item Type:
Report
Language:
en
Description:
Introduction to children’s rights in healthcare The United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child (CRC) is an international legal instrument that sets out the rights of children – defined as all those under 18 years. Ireland ratified the Convention in 1992 and under Article 4, Government is required to take measures to promote, protect and fulfil children’s rights (Committee on the Rights of the Child, General Comment No. 15, 2013: 71). The Convention is a comprehensive document and among its provisions are Article 24, which recognises the child’s right to the highest attainable standard of healthcare and to facilities for the treatment of illness and rehabilitation of health. According to the Committee on the Rights of the Child, this requires that children receive ‘quality health services’ which at the primary level are in sufficient quantity and quality, functional, within the physical and financial reach of all sections of the child population, and acceptable to all… Secondary and tertiary level care should also be made available, to the extent possible, with functional referral systems linking communities and families at all levels of the health system (General Comment No. 15, 2013: 25). Beyond Article 24, the Committee on the Rights of the Child has stressed the importance of viewing children’s health as indivisible from and inter-connected to the child’s other rights.1 The Convention’s four general principles are particularly important in this context. These principles are: non-discrimination – that children are entitled to enjoy all rights without discrimination under Article 2; best interests - that the child’s best interest are a primary consideration in all actions concerning the child under Article 3; the right to life, survival and development under Article 6, and the right of the child to express his/her views and have them given due weight in all matters affecting the child in accordance with the child’s age and maturity under Article 12 (Committee on the Rights of the Child, General Comment No. 15, 2013: 8-19). The Committee has highlighted the importance of a broad based approach to children’s health, acknowledging that different developmental stages will require different health priorities, and requiring account to be taken of the life cycle and the social determinants of health (para. 20-22). It has also noted the importance of responding to and understanding children’s evolving capacities as the child moves towards independent decision-making (para. 20-22). Article 12 of the Convention requires that children be facilitated and supported to participate in individual decisions about their healthcare and in the development and implementation of healthcare policy and healthcare services (Committee on the Rights of the Child, General Comment No.12, 2009: 98-104). It also requires children’s views to be taken into account on all aspects of health provisions, including, for example, what services are needed, how and where they are best provided, barriers to accessing or using services, the quality of the services and the attitudes of health professionals, how to strengthen children’s capacities to take increasing levels of responsibility for their own health and development, and how to involve them more effectively in the provision of services, as peer educators (Committee on the Rights of the Child, General Comment No. 15, 2013: 19).
ISBN:
9781907074257

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorKilkelly, Ursulaen_GB
dc.contributor.authorSavage, Eileenen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2014-05-01T13:56:46Z-
dc.date.available2014-05-01T13:56:46Z-
dc.date.issued2013-11-
dc.identifier.citationKilkelly, Ursula; Savage, Eileen Child-friendly healthcare. Ombudsman for Children Office. Nov. 2013en_GB
dc.identifier.isbn9781907074257-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/316410-
dc.descriptionIntroduction to children’s rights in healthcare The United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child (CRC) is an international legal instrument that sets out the rights of children – defined as all those under 18 years. Ireland ratified the Convention in 1992 and under Article 4, Government is required to take measures to promote, protect and fulfil children’s rights (Committee on the Rights of the Child, General Comment No. 15, 2013: 71). The Convention is a comprehensive document and among its provisions are Article 24, which recognises the child’s right to the highest attainable standard of healthcare and to facilities for the treatment of illness and rehabilitation of health. According to the Committee on the Rights of the Child, this requires that children receive ‘quality health services’ which at the primary level are in sufficient quantity and quality, functional, within the physical and financial reach of all sections of the child population, and acceptable to all… Secondary and tertiary level care should also be made available, to the extent possible, with functional referral systems linking communities and families at all levels of the health system (General Comment No. 15, 2013: 25). Beyond Article 24, the Committee on the Rights of the Child has stressed the importance of viewing children’s health as indivisible from and inter-connected to the child’s other rights.1 The Convention’s four general principles are particularly important in this context. These principles are: non-discrimination – that children are entitled to enjoy all rights without discrimination under Article 2; best interests - that the child’s best interest are a primary consideration in all actions concerning the child under Article 3; the right to life, survival and development under Article 6, and the right of the child to express his/her views and have them given due weight in all matters affecting the child in accordance with the child’s age and maturity under Article 12 (Committee on the Rights of the Child, General Comment No. 15, 2013: 8-19). The Committee has highlighted the importance of a broad based approach to children’s health, acknowledging that different developmental stages will require different health priorities, and requiring account to be taken of the life cycle and the social determinants of health (para. 20-22). It has also noted the importance of responding to and understanding children’s evolving capacities as the child moves towards independent decision-making (para. 20-22). Article 12 of the Convention requires that children be facilitated and supported to participate in individual decisions about their healthcare and in the development and implementation of healthcare policy and healthcare services (Committee on the Rights of the Child, General Comment No.12, 2009: 98-104). It also requires children’s views to be taken into account on all aspects of health provisions, including, for example, what services are needed, how and where they are best provided, barriers to accessing or using services, the quality of the services and the attitudes of health professionals, how to strengthen children’s capacities to take increasing levels of responsibility for their own health and development, and how to involve them more effectively in the provision of services, as peer educators (Committee on the Rights of the Child, General Comment No. 15, 2013: 19).en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherOmbudsman for Children Office (OCO)en_GB
dc.titleChild-friendly healthcareen_GB
dc.typeReporten
dc.contributor.departmentFaculty of Law, UCC and School of Nursing and Midwifery, UCCen_GB
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