Public health nursing in Ireland: demonstrating interventions from practice-validating public health nursing actions using the American Intervention Wheel

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/315652
Title:
Public health nursing in Ireland: demonstrating interventions from practice-validating public health nursing actions using the American Intervention Wheel
Authors:
Population Health Interest Group; McDonald, Anne; Duignan, Catriona; Healy, Marianne; Irving, Annette; Martiensson, Patricia; Molloy, Brenda; McNicholas, Elizabeth Sr.; Frazer, Kate
Citation:
Population Health Interest Group (2013) Public Health Nursing in Ireland: Demonstrating interventions from practice. Institute of Community Health Nursing, Dublin.
Publisher:
Institute of Community Health Nursing, Dublin.
Issue Date:
2013
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/315652
Item Type:
Report
Language:
en
Description:
The American Wheel of Interventions emerged from an observed need for a common language, a lexicon, for public health nurses to use in describing their common actions regardless of a particular work assignment. The time was the mid-1990’s in Minnesota; those observing were public health nurses who provided consultation to local health departments on behalf of the Minnesota Department of Health. With the assistance of a federal grant, the Wheel and its use was refined through an extensive literature search and field testing with public health nurses in four additional upper Midwest states. Since the final manual, “Public Health Interventions: Application for Public Health Nursing,” was made available online in 2001 both PHNs in practice and PHN educators have adopted it widely. The Wheel has been translated into many languages, incorporated into practice models for public health nursing departments in the States as well as abroad, and provided a model for numerous academic papers and dissertations. In truth, we really have no idea how wide and far the Wheel has found purchase. That is why we are very excited to collaborate in the development of “Public Health Nursing in Ireland: Demonstrating Interventions from Practice” by the ICHN Population Health Interest Group. In reading the public health nursing stories from Ireland we are struck by the similarities of the work and yet subtle differences. Some is attributable to differences in use of the English language. In Ireland there are “mums,” for instance, while in America we have “moms.” Mums or moms, however, their circumstances are strikingly similar—inadequate income, poor housing, children with special needs. And, of course, there are significant differences in how health care services are delivered in each country. In Ireland there is a public system providing health care to all supplemented by a private system for those who can afford it. In America there is a private health insurance sector dependent on employment and a publically-funded supplementary system that provides insurance for those who meet certain income and asset guidelines. However, there is no guarantee of access to health care services. Although the 2010 passage of the Affordable Care Act by the American Congress holds the promise of remedies, much remains to be seen whether it can meet the demands placed on it to expand insurance coverage, control health care costs, and improve health care outcomes. In America, for instance, no newborn is assured the offer of a followup home visit by a public health nurse.
Keywords:
NURSES; NURSING; PUBLIC HEALTH; RESEARCH

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorPopulation Health Interest Groupen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMcDonald, Anneen_GB
dc.contributor.authorDuignan, Catrionaen_GB
dc.contributor.authorHealy, Marianneen_GB
dc.contributor.authorIrving, Annetteen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMartiensson, Patriciaen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMolloy, Brendaen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMcNicholas, Elizabeth Sr.en_GB
dc.contributor.authorFrazer, Kateen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2014-04-10T15:00:08Z-
dc.date.available2014-04-10T15:00:08Z-
dc.date.issued2013-
dc.identifier.citationPopulation Health Interest Group (2013) Public Health Nursing in Ireland: Demonstrating interventions from practice. Institute of Community Health Nursing, Dublin.en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/315652-
dc.descriptionThe American Wheel of Interventions emerged from an observed need for a common language, a lexicon, for public health nurses to use in describing their common actions regardless of a particular work assignment. The time was the mid-1990’s in Minnesota; those observing were public health nurses who provided consultation to local health departments on behalf of the Minnesota Department of Health. With the assistance of a federal grant, the Wheel and its use was refined through an extensive literature search and field testing with public health nurses in four additional upper Midwest states. Since the final manual, “Public Health Interventions: Application for Public Health Nursing,” was made available online in 2001 both PHNs in practice and PHN educators have adopted it widely. The Wheel has been translated into many languages, incorporated into practice models for public health nursing departments in the States as well as abroad, and provided a model for numerous academic papers and dissertations. In truth, we really have no idea how wide and far the Wheel has found purchase. That is why we are very excited to collaborate in the development of “Public Health Nursing in Ireland: Demonstrating Interventions from Practice” by the ICHN Population Health Interest Group. In reading the public health nursing stories from Ireland we are struck by the similarities of the work and yet subtle differences. Some is attributable to differences in use of the English language. In Ireland there are “mums,” for instance, while in America we have “moms.” Mums or moms, however, their circumstances are strikingly similar—inadequate income, poor housing, children with special needs. And, of course, there are significant differences in how health care services are delivered in each country. In Ireland there is a public system providing health care to all supplemented by a private system for those who can afford it. In America there is a private health insurance sector dependent on employment and a publically-funded supplementary system that provides insurance for those who meet certain income and asset guidelines. However, there is no guarantee of access to health care services. Although the 2010 passage of the Affordable Care Act by the American Congress holds the promise of remedies, much remains to be seen whether it can meet the demands placed on it to expand insurance coverage, control health care costs, and improve health care outcomes. In America, for instance, no newborn is assured the offer of a followup home visit by a public health nurse.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherInstitute of Community Health Nursing, Dublin.en_GB
dc.subjectNURSESen_GB
dc.subjectNURSINGen_GB
dc.subjectPUBLIC HEALTHen_GB
dc.subjectRESEARCHen_GB
dc.titlePublic health nursing in Ireland: demonstrating interventions from practice-validating public health nursing actions using the American Intervention Wheelen_GB
dc.typeReporten
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