The influence of a low glycemic index dietary intervention on maternal dietary intake, glycemic index and gestational weight gain during pregnancy: a randomized controlled trial

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/315474
Title:
The influence of a low glycemic index dietary intervention on maternal dietary intake, glycemic index and gestational weight gain during pregnancy: a randomized controlled trial
Authors:
McGowan, Ciara A; Walsh, Jennifer M; Byrne, Jacinta; Curran, Sinead; McAuliffe, Fionnuala M
Citation:
Nutrition journal. 2013 Oct 31;12(1):140
Journal:
Nutrition journal
Issue Date:
31-Oct-2013
URI:
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1475-2891-12-140; http://hdl.handle.net/10147/315474
Abstract:
Abstract Background Maternal diet is known to impact pregnancy outcome. Following a low glycemic index (GI) diet during pregnancy has been shown to improve maternal glycemia and reduce infant birthweight and may be associated with a higher fibre intake. We assessed the impact of a low GI dietary intervention on maternal GI, nutritional intake and gestational weight gain (GWG) during pregnancy. Compliance and acceptability of the low GI diet was also examined. Method Eight hundred women were randomised in early pregnancy to receive low GI and healthy eating dietary advice or to receive standard maternity care. The intervention group received dietary advice at a group education session before 22 weeks gestation. All women completed a 3 day food diary during each trimester of pregnancy. Two hundred and thirty five women from the intervention arm and 285 women from the control arm returned complete 3x3d FDs and were included in the present analysis. Results Maternal GI was significantly reduced in the intervention group at trimester 2 and 3. The numbers of women within the lowest quartile of GI increased from 37% in trimester 1 to 52% in trimester 3 (P < 0.001) among the intervention group. The intervention group had significantly lower energy intake (P < 0.05), higher protein (% TE) (P < 0.01) and higher dietary fibre intake (P < 0.01) post intervention. Consumption of food groups with known high GI values were significantly reduced among the intervention group. Women in the intervention low GI group were less likely to exceed the Institute of Medicine’s GWG goals. Conclusion A dietary intervention in early pregnancy had a positive influence on maternal GI, food and nutrient intakes and GWG. Following a low GI diet may be particularly beneficial for women at risk of exceeding the GWG goals for pregnancy. Trial registration Current Controlled Trials Registration Number: ISRCTN54392969.
Item Type:
Article
Language:
en
Keywords:
PREGNANCY; NUTRITION

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorMcGowan, Ciara Aen_GB
dc.contributor.authorWalsh, Jennifer Men_GB
dc.contributor.authorByrne, Jacintaen_GB
dc.contributor.authorCurran, Sineaden_GB
dc.contributor.authorMcAuliffe, Fionnuala Men_GB
dc.date.accessioned2014-04-07T11:20:07Z-
dc.date.available2014-04-07T11:20:07Z-
dc.date.issued2013-10-31-
dc.identifier.citationNutrition journal. 2013 Oct 31;12(1):140en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1475-2891-12-140-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/315474-
dc.description.abstractAbstract Background Maternal diet is known to impact pregnancy outcome. Following a low glycemic index (GI) diet during pregnancy has been shown to improve maternal glycemia and reduce infant birthweight and may be associated with a higher fibre intake. We assessed the impact of a low GI dietary intervention on maternal GI, nutritional intake and gestational weight gain (GWG) during pregnancy. Compliance and acceptability of the low GI diet was also examined. Method Eight hundred women were randomised in early pregnancy to receive low GI and healthy eating dietary advice or to receive standard maternity care. The intervention group received dietary advice at a group education session before 22 weeks gestation. All women completed a 3 day food diary during each trimester of pregnancy. Two hundred and thirty five women from the intervention arm and 285 women from the control arm returned complete 3x3d FDs and were included in the present analysis. Results Maternal GI was significantly reduced in the intervention group at trimester 2 and 3. The numbers of women within the lowest quartile of GI increased from 37% in trimester 1 to 52% in trimester 3 (P < 0.001) among the intervention group. The intervention group had significantly lower energy intake (P < 0.05), higher protein (% TE) (P < 0.01) and higher dietary fibre intake (P < 0.01) post intervention. Consumption of food groups with known high GI values were significantly reduced among the intervention group. Women in the intervention low GI group were less likely to exceed the Institute of Medicine’s GWG goals. Conclusion A dietary intervention in early pregnancy had a positive influence on maternal GI, food and nutrient intakes and GWG. Following a low GI diet may be particularly beneficial for women at risk of exceeding the GWG goals for pregnancy. Trial registration Current Controlled Trials Registration Number: ISRCTN54392969.-
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subjectPREGNANCYen_GB
dc.subjectNUTRITIONen_GB
dc.titleThe influence of a low glycemic index dietary intervention on maternal dietary intake, glycemic index and gestational weight gain during pregnancy: a randomized controlled trialen_GB
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalNutrition journalen_GB
dc.language.rfc3066en-
dc.rights.holderCiara A McGowan et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.-
dc.description.statusPeer Reviewed-
dc.date.updated2014-04-05T11:15:22Z-
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