Psychotic symptoms, functioning and coping in adolescents with mental illness

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/315449
Title:
Psychotic symptoms, functioning and coping in adolescents with mental illness
Authors:
Wigman, Johanna TW; Devlin, Nina; Kelleher, Ian; Murtagh, Aileen; Harley, Michelle; Kehoe, Anne; Fitzpatrick, Carol; Cannon, Mary
Citation:
BMC Psychiatry. 2014 Apr 01;14(1):97
Issue Date:
1-Apr-2014
URI:
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1471-244X-14-97; http://hdl.handle.net/10147/315449
Abstract:
Abstract Background Psychotic symptoms in the context of psychiatric disorders are associated with poor functional outcomes. Environmental stressors are important in the development of psychosis; however, distress may only be pathogenic when it exceeds an individual’s ability to cope with it. Therefore, one interesting factor regarding poor functional outcomes in patients with psychotic symptoms may be poor coping. This paper aimed to address the question whether 1) psychotic symptoms are associated with poorer functioning and 2) whether poor coping moderated the association. Methods In a clinical case-clinical control study of 106 newly-referred adolescent patients with non-psychotic psychiatric disorders, coping was investigated using the Adolescents Coping Scale. Severity of impairment in socio-occupational functioning was assessed with the Children’s Global Assessment Scale. Results Patients with non-psychotic psychiatric disorders and additional psychotic symptoms (N = 50) had poorer functioning and were more likely to use avoidance-oriented coping compared to patients with non-psychotic psychiatric disorders without psychotic symptoms (N = 56). No differences were found with respect to approach-oriented coping. When stratifying for poor/good coping, only those adolescent patients with psychotic symptoms who applied poor coping (i.e. less use of approach-oriented coping styles [OR 0.24, p < 0.015] and more use of avoidance-oriented coping [OR 0.23, p < 0.034]) had poorer functioning. However, these interactions were not significant. Conclusions Non-adaptive coping and poorer functioning were more often present in adolescents with non-psychotic psychiatric disorders and additional psychotic symptoms. Due to small subgroups, our analyses could not give definitive conclusions about the question whether coping moderated the association between psychotic symptoms and functioning. Improvement of coping skills may form an important target for intervention that may contribute to better clinical and functional outcomes in patients with psychotic symptoms.
Item Type:
Article
Language:
en
Keywords:
MENTAL AND BEHAVIOURAL DISORDER; YOUNG PEOPLE

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorWigman, Johanna TWen_GB
dc.contributor.authorDevlin, Ninaen_GB
dc.contributor.authorKelleher, Ianen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMurtagh, Aileenen_GB
dc.contributor.authorHarley, Michelleen_GB
dc.contributor.authorKehoe, Anneen_GB
dc.contributor.authorFitzpatrick, Carolen_GB
dc.contributor.authorCannon, Maryen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2014-04-07T08:38:37Z-
dc.date.available2014-04-07T08:38:37Z-
dc.date.issued2014-04-01-
dc.identifier.citationBMC Psychiatry. 2014 Apr 01;14(1):97en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1471-244X-14-97-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/315449-
dc.description.abstractAbstract Background Psychotic symptoms in the context of psychiatric disorders are associated with poor functional outcomes. Environmental stressors are important in the development of psychosis; however, distress may only be pathogenic when it exceeds an individual’s ability to cope with it. Therefore, one interesting factor regarding poor functional outcomes in patients with psychotic symptoms may be poor coping. This paper aimed to address the question whether 1) psychotic symptoms are associated with poorer functioning and 2) whether poor coping moderated the association. Methods In a clinical case-clinical control study of 106 newly-referred adolescent patients with non-psychotic psychiatric disorders, coping was investigated using the Adolescents Coping Scale. Severity of impairment in socio-occupational functioning was assessed with the Children’s Global Assessment Scale. Results Patients with non-psychotic psychiatric disorders and additional psychotic symptoms (N = 50) had poorer functioning and were more likely to use avoidance-oriented coping compared to patients with non-psychotic psychiatric disorders without psychotic symptoms (N = 56). No differences were found with respect to approach-oriented coping. When stratifying for poor/good coping, only those adolescent patients with psychotic symptoms who applied poor coping (i.e. less use of approach-oriented coping styles [OR 0.24, p < 0.015] and more use of avoidance-oriented coping [OR 0.23, p < 0.034]) had poorer functioning. However, these interactions were not significant. Conclusions Non-adaptive coping and poorer functioning were more often present in adolescents with non-psychotic psychiatric disorders and additional psychotic symptoms. Due to small subgroups, our analyses could not give definitive conclusions about the question whether coping moderated the association between psychotic symptoms and functioning. Improvement of coping skills may form an important target for intervention that may contribute to better clinical and functional outcomes in patients with psychotic symptoms.-
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subjectMENTAL AND BEHAVIOURAL DISORDERen_GB
dc.subjectYOUNG PEOPLEen_GB
dc.titlePsychotic symptoms, functioning and coping in adolescents with mental illnessen_GB
dc.typeArticleen
dc.language.rfc3066en-
dc.rights.holderJohanna TW Wigman et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.-
dc.description.statusPeer Reviewed-
dc.date.updated2014-04-05T11:05:00Z-
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