A review of international evidence on interagency working, to inform the development of children’s services committees in Ireland

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/315237
Title:
A review of international evidence on interagency working, to inform the development of children’s services committees in Ireland
Authors:
Department of Children and Youth Affairs (DCYA); Statham, June Prof.; Centre for Effective Services (CES)
Affiliation:
Thomas Coram Research Unit, Institute of Education, University of London
Citation:
Statham, June [et. al]. A review of international evidence on interagency working, to inform the development of children’s services committees in Ireland. Dublin. Department of Children and Youth Affairs. 2011.
Issue Date:
2011
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/315237
Item Type:
Report
Language:
en
Description:
This rapid literature review was commissioned by the Centre for Effective Services (CES) on behalf of the Office of the Minister for Children and Youth Affairs (OMCYA, now the Department of Children and Youth Affairs) as part of work to support the Working Together for Children initiative in Ireland. Children’s Services Committees (CSCs) aim to bring together local agencies working with children and their families to plan services collaboratively and to develop ways of improving outcomes for children and young people in Ireland. This reflects a common trend in many jurisdictions towards increased interagency working and towards an outcomes-focused approach to service delivery. Aims of study The primary aim of this review is to contribute to the evidence base for developing CSCs in Ireland. It therefore focuses on specific aspects of interagency working that have already been adopted by existing CSCs or are being considered by the DCYA, and within that on models of particular interest, rather than attempting to provide a comprehensive overview of interagency working in general. Specific aims are: 1. to provide a high-level summary of the impact of interagency working on outcomes for children and young people; 2. to undertake a more in-depth analysis of the international evidence for a number of specific approaches to or aspects of interagency working. The following four areas were selected in consultation with the commissioner of the study: ÎÎ joint planning structures; ÎÎ methods and tools for joint needs assessment; ÎÎ the differential/alternative response approach to child welfare; ÎÎ systems to support information sharing between agencies. 3. to identify key barriers and facilitators to successful interagency working and to implementing each of the above approaches. Methods The strategy for sourcing relevant articles and reports was chosen to maximise the likelihood of identifying material that would be useful in the context of developing interagency working through Children’s Services Committees in Ireland. Two main methods were used to address the research aims. The first aim required a concise summary of evidence on whether interagency working improves outcomes for children, and the approach here was to draw out overarching messages from 8 good quality existing overviews and syntheses of research evidence, supplemented where necessary by findings from key studies. More detailed searching was carried out to identify relevant material to address the second and third research aims. This included searches of key bibliographic databases (restricted to material published in English in 2000 or later); use of Internet search engines; browsing of relevant international websites for Governments, agencies and research centres; and contact with experts in the field to identify relevant sources of information and to clarify how particular programmes worked. (The latter was necessary since the picture emerging from published material was sometimes confused and contradictory.) From a large number of items identified in the initial searches, 121 were selected for inclusion in the review, the majority of them research studies or reviews/syntheses of research evidence. Most of the evidence relates to the UK (all four countries) or the USA since this is where the models and approaches under consideration have been evaluated. But studies are also included from Ireland and New Zealand, and from a wide range of other countries through two international reviews (CfBT Education Trust, 2010 and Léveillé and Chamberland, 2010).
Keywords:
YOUNG PEOPLE; CHILD HEALTH; INTERAGENCY WORKING
Local subject classification:
LITERATURE REVIEW

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorDepartment of Children and Youth Affairs (DCYA)en_GB
dc.contributor.authorStatham, June Prof.en_GB
dc.contributor.authorCentre for Effective Services (CES)en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2014-04-03T13:28:53Z-
dc.date.available2014-04-03T13:28:53Z-
dc.date.issued2011-
dc.identifier.citationStatham, June [et. al]. A review of international evidence on interagency working, to inform the development of children’s services committees in Ireland. Dublin. Department of Children and Youth Affairs. 2011.en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/315237-
dc.descriptionThis rapid literature review was commissioned by the Centre for Effective Services (CES) on behalf of the Office of the Minister for Children and Youth Affairs (OMCYA, now the Department of Children and Youth Affairs) as part of work to support the Working Together for Children initiative in Ireland. Children’s Services Committees (CSCs) aim to bring together local agencies working with children and their families to plan services collaboratively and to develop ways of improving outcomes for children and young people in Ireland. This reflects a common trend in many jurisdictions towards increased interagency working and towards an outcomes-focused approach to service delivery. Aims of study The primary aim of this review is to contribute to the evidence base for developing CSCs in Ireland. It therefore focuses on specific aspects of interagency working that have already been adopted by existing CSCs or are being considered by the DCYA, and within that on models of particular interest, rather than attempting to provide a comprehensive overview of interagency working in general. Specific aims are: 1. to provide a high-level summary of the impact of interagency working on outcomes for children and young people; 2. to undertake a more in-depth analysis of the international evidence for a number of specific approaches to or aspects of interagency working. The following four areas were selected in consultation with the commissioner of the study: ÎÎ joint planning structures; ÎÎ methods and tools for joint needs assessment; ÎÎ the differential/alternative response approach to child welfare; ÎÎ systems to support information sharing between agencies. 3. to identify key barriers and facilitators to successful interagency working and to implementing each of the above approaches. Methods The strategy for sourcing relevant articles and reports was chosen to maximise the likelihood of identifying material that would be useful in the context of developing interagency working through Children’s Services Committees in Ireland. Two main methods were used to address the research aims. The first aim required a concise summary of evidence on whether interagency working improves outcomes for children, and the approach here was to draw out overarching messages from 8 good quality existing overviews and syntheses of research evidence, supplemented where necessary by findings from key studies. More detailed searching was carried out to identify relevant material to address the second and third research aims. This included searches of key bibliographic databases (restricted to material published in English in 2000 or later); use of Internet search engines; browsing of relevant international websites for Governments, agencies and research centres; and contact with experts in the field to identify relevant sources of information and to clarify how particular programmes worked. (The latter was necessary since the picture emerging from published material was sometimes confused and contradictory.) From a large number of items identified in the initial searches, 121 were selected for inclusion in the review, the majority of them research studies or reviews/syntheses of research evidence. Most of the evidence relates to the UK (all four countries) or the USA since this is where the models and approaches under consideration have been evaluated. But studies are also included from Ireland and New Zealand, and from a wide range of other countries through two international reviews (CfBT Education Trust, 2010 and Léveillé and Chamberland, 2010).en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subjectYOUNG PEOPLEen_GB
dc.subjectCHILD HEALTHen_GB
dc.subjectINTERAGENCY WORKINGen_GB
dc.subject.otherLITERATURE REVIEWen_GB
dc.titleA review of international evidence on interagency working, to inform the development of children’s services committees in Irelanden_GB
dc.typeReporten
dc.contributor.departmentThomas Coram Research Unit, Institute of Education, University of Londonen_GB
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