Group problem-solving skills training for self-harm: randomised controlled trial.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/313549
Title:
Group problem-solving skills training for self-harm: randomised controlled trial.
Authors:
McAuliffe, Carmel; McLeavey, Breda C; Fitzgerald, Tony; Corcoran, Paul; Carroll, Bernie; Ryan, Louise; O'Keeffe, Brian; Fitzgerald, Eva; Hickey, Portia; O'Regan, Mary; Mulqueen, Jillian; Arensman, Ella
Citation:
Group problem-solving skills training for self-harm: randomised controlled trial. 2014: Br J Psychiatry
Journal:
The British journal of psychiatry : the journal of mental science
Issue Date:
16-Jan-2014
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/313549
DOI:
10.1192/bjp.bp.111.101816
PubMed ID:
24434070
Abstract:
Rates of self-harm are high and have recently increased. This trend and the repetitive nature of self-harm pose a significant challenge to mental health services.; To determine the efficacy of a structured group problem-solving skills training (PST) programme as an intervention approach for self-harm in addition to treatment as usual (TAU) as offered by mental health services.; A total of 433 participants (aged 18-64 years) were randomly assigned to TAU plus PST or TAU alone. Assessments were carried out at baseline and at 6-week and 6-month follow-up and repeated hospital-treated self-harm was ascertained at 12-month follow-up.; The treatment groups did not differ in rates of repeated self-harm at 6-week, 6-month and 12-month follow-up. Both treatment groups showed significant improvements in psychological and social functioning at follow-up. Only one measure (needing and receiving practical help from those closest to them) showed a positive treatment effect at 6-week (P = 0.004) and 6-month (P = 0.01) follow-up. Repetition was not associated with waiting time in the PST group.; This brief intervention for self-harm is no more effective than treatment as usual. Further work is required to establish whether a modified, more intensive programme delivered sooner after the index episode would be effective.
Item Type:
Article
Language:
en
Keywords:
PSYCHIATRY; SUICIDE; SELF HARM
ISSN:
1472-1465

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorMcAuliffe, Carmelen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMcLeavey, Breda Cen_GB
dc.contributor.authorFitzgerald, Tonyen_GB
dc.contributor.authorCorcoran, Paulen_GB
dc.contributor.authorCarroll, Bernieen_GB
dc.contributor.authorRyan, Louiseen_GB
dc.contributor.authorO'Keeffe, Brianen_GB
dc.contributor.authorFitzgerald, Evaen_GB
dc.contributor.authorHickey, Portiaen_GB
dc.contributor.authorO'Regan, Maryen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMulqueen, Jillianen_GB
dc.contributor.authorArensman, Ellaen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2014-02-28T16:35:42Z-
dc.date.available2014-02-28T16:35:42Z-
dc.date.issued2014-01-16-
dc.identifier.citationGroup problem-solving skills training for self-harm: randomised controlled trial. 2014: Br J Psychiatryen_GB
dc.identifier.issn1472-1465-
dc.identifier.pmid24434070-
dc.identifier.doi10.1192/bjp.bp.111.101816-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/313549-
dc.description.abstractRates of self-harm are high and have recently increased. This trend and the repetitive nature of self-harm pose a significant challenge to mental health services.-
dc.description.abstractTo determine the efficacy of a structured group problem-solving skills training (PST) programme as an intervention approach for self-harm in addition to treatment as usual (TAU) as offered by mental health services.-
dc.description.abstractA total of 433 participants (aged 18-64 years) were randomly assigned to TAU plus PST or TAU alone. Assessments were carried out at baseline and at 6-week and 6-month follow-up and repeated hospital-treated self-harm was ascertained at 12-month follow-up.-
dc.description.abstractThe treatment groups did not differ in rates of repeated self-harm at 6-week, 6-month and 12-month follow-up. Both treatment groups showed significant improvements in psychological and social functioning at follow-up. Only one measure (needing and receiving practical help from those closest to them) showed a positive treatment effect at 6-week (P = 0.004) and 6-month (P = 0.01) follow-up. Repetition was not associated with waiting time in the PST group.-
dc.description.abstractThis brief intervention for self-harm is no more effective than treatment as usual. Further work is required to establish whether a modified, more intensive programme delivered sooner after the index episode would be effective.-
dc.languageENG-
dc.language.isoenen
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to The British journal of psychiatry : the journal of mental scienceen_GB
dc.subjectPSYCHIATRYen_GB
dc.subjectSUICIDEen_GB
dc.subjectSELF HARMen_GB
dc.titleGroup problem-solving skills training for self-harm: randomised controlled trial.en_GB
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalThe British journal of psychiatry : the journal of mental scienceen_GB
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