Understanding participation in knowledge-sharing in virtual communities of practice on the HSELanD elearning portal [thesis] / by Sandra Gormley

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/312142
Title:
Understanding participation in knowledge-sharing in virtual communities of practice on the HSELanD elearning portal [thesis] / by Sandra Gormley
Authors:
Gormley, Sandra
Is Part Of:
A dissertation submitted to Trinity College Dublin, in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Science in Health Informatics 2012
Affiliation:
Health Service Executive (HSE)
Publisher:
University of Dublin, Trinity College
Issue Date:
Dec-2012
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/312142
Item Type:
Thesis
Language:
en
Description:
Recognising the value of knowledge as a substantial asset and key resource in the organisation, the Health Service Executive’s (HSE) Knowledge Management strategy has introduced the opportunity of participation in VCoPs (Virtual Communities of Practice) to its employees. The sharing of best practices and expert knowledge through inter-professional collaboration is enabled by the medium of Web 2.0 tools, such as blogs and wikis, with forums facilitating discussion on particular topics of interest to contributors. However, successful VCoPs depend on active contribution of knowledge and it appears that these resources are not in general or widespread use, with little participation in knowledge-sharing in evidence. Using a cross-sectional survey, this study aimed to discover the factors which motivate hospital employees and act as barriers to their knowledge-sharing in VCoPs on the HSELanD elearning portal. A questionnaire based on theories of motivation and the technology acceptance model (TAM) enabled data collection from a non-probability, convenience sample of HSE employees at a regional Irish hospital. The majority of respondents in the sample - 72.4 %( n=131) - revealed that they were unaware of the existence of social media to enable knowledge-sharing on HSELanD. Altruistic characteristics were shown to be significant determinants of employees’ motivation to share their knowledge, concurring with the findings of previous research. Respondents perceive knowledge-sharing as useful and relevant, regarding reciprocity and recognition by superiors as important factors, while external rewards in the form of opportunities for promotion, financial rewards or chances to show off were reported as the least motivating factors. The lack of time at work to access HSELanD and disinterest in pursuing knowledge-sharing using the portal outside of work time was clearly indicated by responses received. Accessibility and usability issues surfaced also as HSELanD was reported as user-unfriendly and difficult to navigate, with many having problems accessing a computer at work. The training needs of employees to use social media for knowledge-sharing are highlighted by the results of this study, specifically in the area of social media use and respondents indicated a willingness to undertake training and their intention to share knowledge. The self-selection of the respondents, low response rate (12.2%) and the limited representativeness of the sample are acknowledged as limiting the validity and generalizability of the findings. Nonetheless, the findings may offer some guidance to HSELanD management in addressing issues identified by the study and recommendations include ensuring employee awareness of the resources, addressing training needs, reviewing portal usability and providing guidance to professionals regarding social media use in the healthcare environment. Implementation of a “soft reward” system to recognise member contributions and enhance motivation should be considered and consultation with relevant professional managers to achieve a consensus on the development of pro-sharing norms is recommended.
Keywords:
RESEARCH; KNOWLEDGE; INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY; EDUCATION; HEALTH SERVICES
Local subject classification:
VIRTUAL COMMUNITIES OF PRACTICE; KNOWLEDGE MANAGEMENT; HEALTH INFORMATICS

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorGormley, Sandraen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2014-02-03T10:34:08Z-
dc.date.available2014-02-03T10:34:08Z-
dc.date.issued2012-12-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/312142-
dc.descriptionRecognising the value of knowledge as a substantial asset and key resource in the organisation, the Health Service Executive’s (HSE) Knowledge Management strategy has introduced the opportunity of participation in VCoPs (Virtual Communities of Practice) to its employees. The sharing of best practices and expert knowledge through inter-professional collaboration is enabled by the medium of Web 2.0 tools, such as blogs and wikis, with forums facilitating discussion on particular topics of interest to contributors. However, successful VCoPs depend on active contribution of knowledge and it appears that these resources are not in general or widespread use, with little participation in knowledge-sharing in evidence. Using a cross-sectional survey, this study aimed to discover the factors which motivate hospital employees and act as barriers to their knowledge-sharing in VCoPs on the HSELanD elearning portal. A questionnaire based on theories of motivation and the technology acceptance model (TAM) enabled data collection from a non-probability, convenience sample of HSE employees at a regional Irish hospital. The majority of respondents in the sample - 72.4 %( n=131) - revealed that they were unaware of the existence of social media to enable knowledge-sharing on HSELanD. Altruistic characteristics were shown to be significant determinants of employees’ motivation to share their knowledge, concurring with the findings of previous research. Respondents perceive knowledge-sharing as useful and relevant, regarding reciprocity and recognition by superiors as important factors, while external rewards in the form of opportunities for promotion, financial rewards or chances to show off were reported as the least motivating factors. The lack of time at work to access HSELanD and disinterest in pursuing knowledge-sharing using the portal outside of work time was clearly indicated by responses received. Accessibility and usability issues surfaced also as HSELanD was reported as user-unfriendly and difficult to navigate, with many having problems accessing a computer at work. The training needs of employees to use social media for knowledge-sharing are highlighted by the results of this study, specifically in the area of social media use and respondents indicated a willingness to undertake training and their intention to share knowledge. The self-selection of the respondents, low response rate (12.2%) and the limited representativeness of the sample are acknowledged as limiting the validity and generalizability of the findings. Nonetheless, the findings may offer some guidance to HSELanD management in addressing issues identified by the study and recommendations include ensuring employee awareness of the resources, addressing training needs, reviewing portal usability and providing guidance to professionals regarding social media use in the healthcare environment. Implementation of a “soft reward” system to recognise member contributions and enhance motivation should be considered and consultation with relevant professional managers to achieve a consensus on the development of pro-sharing norms is recommended.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherUniversity of Dublin, Trinity Collegeen_GB
dc.relation.ispartofA dissertation submitted to Trinity College Dublin, in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Science in Health Informatics 2012en_GB
dc.subjectRESEARCHen_GB
dc.subjectKNOWLEDGEen_GB
dc.subjectINFORMATION TECHNOLOGYen_GB
dc.subjectEDUCATIONen_GB
dc.subjectHEALTH SERVICESen_GB
dc.subject.otherVIRTUAL COMMUNITIES OF PRACTICEen_GB
dc.subject.otherKNOWLEDGE MANAGEMENTen_GB
dc.subject.otherHEALTH INFORMATICSen_GB
dc.titleUnderstanding participation in knowledge-sharing in virtual communities of practice on the HSELanD elearning portal [thesis] / by Sandra Gormleyen_GB
dc.typeThesisen
dc.contributor.departmentHealth Service Executive (HSE)en_GB
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