Laboratory test costs: Attitudes and awareness among staff in a regional hospital

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/311905
Title:
Laboratory test costs: Attitudes and awareness among staff in a regional hospital
Authors:
Clancy, C; Murphy, M
Publisher:
Irish Medical Journal (IMJ)
Journal:
Irish Medical Journal (IMJ)
Issue Date:
Jan-2013
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/311905
Abstract:
There continues to be an unrelenting rise in the volumes of laboratory tests ordered in medicine, which is both expensive and has the potential for over-investigation. We performed a quantitative, observational, cross-sectional study of staff with the authority to initiate a laboratory test, using a voluntary, anonymous questionnaire. Our aim was to assess the awareness of and attitudes towards laboratory test costs. 226 surveys were completed over 2 weeks in June, 2012. Most numerous respondents were Staff nurses 125 (55.3%) followed by senior house officers (SHOs) 26 (11.5%) and clinical nurse managers/ specialists (CNMs and CNSs) 23 (10.2%). The majority of staff, 191(85.6%), felt unaware of the cost of laboratory tests, which they ordered. For non urgent tests, the majority of respondents, 136 (61.8%) felt cost was either quite of very important. For urgent tests, the majority of respondents, 188(84.6%) felt cost was of minor or of no importance. Doctors felt more aware of costs than nurses (26.9% vs. 9.3%) and doctors test cost estimates were correct more often than nurses (33% vs. 21%). The results indicate poor awareness of laboratory test cost amongst doctors and nurses. Given the expenditure incurred by a rise in the volume of tests and the potential for over-investigation for patients, strategies for improving the awareness of and attitudes towards laboratory tests need to be developed.
Item Type:
Article
Language:
en
Keywords:
LABORATORY SERVICE; HEALTH ECONOMICS

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorClancy, Cen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMurphy, Men_GB
dc.date.accessioned2014-01-27T12:13:02Z-
dc.date.available2014-01-27T12:13:02Z-
dc.date.issued2013-01-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/311905-
dc.description.abstractThere continues to be an unrelenting rise in the volumes of laboratory tests ordered in medicine, which is both expensive and has the potential for over-investigation. We performed a quantitative, observational, cross-sectional study of staff with the authority to initiate a laboratory test, using a voluntary, anonymous questionnaire. Our aim was to assess the awareness of and attitudes towards laboratory test costs. 226 surveys were completed over 2 weeks in June, 2012. Most numerous respondents were Staff nurses 125 (55.3%) followed by senior house officers (SHOs) 26 (11.5%) and clinical nurse managers/ specialists (CNMs and CNSs) 23 (10.2%). The majority of staff, 191(85.6%), felt unaware of the cost of laboratory tests, which they ordered. For non urgent tests, the majority of respondents, 136 (61.8%) felt cost was either quite of very important. For urgent tests, the majority of respondents, 188(84.6%) felt cost was of minor or of no importance. Doctors felt more aware of costs than nurses (26.9% vs. 9.3%) and doctors test cost estimates were correct more often than nurses (33% vs. 21%). The results indicate poor awareness of laboratory test cost amongst doctors and nurses. Given the expenditure incurred by a rise in the volume of tests and the potential for over-investigation for patients, strategies for improving the awareness of and attitudes towards laboratory tests need to be developed.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherIrish Medical Journal (IMJ)en_GB
dc.subjectLABORATORY SERVICEen_GB
dc.subjectHEALTH ECONOMICSen_GB
dc.titleLaboratory test costs: Attitudes and awareness among staff in a regional hospitalen_GB
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalIrish Medical Journal (IMJ)en_GB
dc.description.fundingNo fundingen
dc.description.provinceConnachten
dc.description.peer-reviewpeer-reviewen
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