Right from the start: Report of the expert advisory group on the early years strategy

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/311126
Title:
Right from the start: Report of the expert advisory group on the early years strategy
Authors:
Department of Children and Youth Affairs (DCYA)
Publisher:
Government Publications, Dublin
Issue Date:
Sep-2013
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/311126
Item Type:
Report
Language:
en
Description:
Preface from the Expert Advisory Group When we first came together as a group, the Minister for Children and Youth Affairs, Frances Fitzgerald, TD, told us that the work we were setting out to do was crucially important and that it could have a lasting impact on generations of children in Ireland. We regard our work on the Expert Advisory Group (EAG) as that fundamental. The terms of reference we were given were as follows: zz To review and advise on the proposed topics and themes for inclusion in the Early Years Strategy to ensure that they are appropriate and comprehensive. zz To comment on the content of the literature review and the key themes identified and in particular to identify any gaps or omissions. zz In the light of the services identified for inclusion in the strategy, to advise on whether other services might be appropriate for inclusion. zz To consider and advise on recommendations for the future. Our task, as we saw it, was to address the needs and opportunities of every child in Ireland from 0 to 6 years of age, encompassing the health of the mother during pregnancy. In this report, we set out the key themes that we have identified and we point to a wide range of supports and services that must be included in the strategy. Our recommendations are evidence-based, drawing on the reports presented to us by the Centre for Effective Services (included as Papers 1-5 in the Appendices to this report), as well as on other academic sources and on the knowledge and experience of the members of the group. If Ireland gets it ‘right from the start, by adopting a comprehensive Early Years Strategy for our children, with a serious commitment to implementation, we will end up with a generation of children, and successive generations, who are happier, healthier, safer, learning more, developing better and coping better with the adversity that life throws up. A comprehensive Early Years Strategy, backed up by national commitment, could shape a stronger and healthier society, and strengthen families. It could break cycles of poverty and disadvantage, and remove barriers of inequality. It could significantly reduce anti-social behaviour, dependency and alienation. It could help to build a stronger economy. The development and implementation of an Early Years Strategy could be the single most effective action on behalf of young children in Ireland in our lifetime. This report is our contribution to that process. A set of recommendations, of course, is not enough. If the people of Ireland really do want to change the future – to ensure that right from the start all our children have the best possible chance – that requires a major statement of political purpose and a radical re-orientation of structures, organisations, resources and policy priorities. 2 Right from the Start: Report of the Expert Advisory Group on the Early Years Strategy It cannot be done ‘on the cheap’ – but there is no investment that the Irish people could make that would pay more dividends. As the Expert Advisory Group began to work together, we asked ourselves some fundamental questions. What do we want for our children? What would success look like? What principles should underpin the strategy? What are the biggest policy gaps and deficits that need to be addressed? What are the key areas of universal provision? How can we build on these to support children with more complex or challenging needs? In this document, we set out our answers to these questions. We are conscious that our report to the Minister will form part of a wider process leading to a broader strategy for children and young people in Ireland, and we look forward to contributing to that debate too. The importance of having a policy for the youngest members of society is underlined by our large and growing early years population. We have over 480,000 children aged 0-6, representing 11% of the population (see Paper 1 in Appendices), including a significant number of children from different ethnicities. It is estimated that by 2021, the total number of children in this age group will have increased by 17%-20%. We have a responsibility to give our children the best possible start in life. What happens to children in their earliest years says much about the kind of nation we are.
Keywords:
YOUNG PEOPLE; CHILD HEALTH
ISBN:
9781406427912

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorDepartment of Children and Youth Affairs (DCYA)en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2014-01-09T11:41:39Z-
dc.date.available2014-01-09T11:41:39Z-
dc.date.issued2013-09-
dc.identifier.isbn9781406427912-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/311126-
dc.descriptionPreface from the Expert Advisory Group When we first came together as a group, the Minister for Children and Youth Affairs, Frances Fitzgerald, TD, told us that the work we were setting out to do was crucially important and that it could have a lasting impact on generations of children in Ireland. We regard our work on the Expert Advisory Group (EAG) as that fundamental. The terms of reference we were given were as follows: zz To review and advise on the proposed topics and themes for inclusion in the Early Years Strategy to ensure that they are appropriate and comprehensive. zz To comment on the content of the literature review and the key themes identified and in particular to identify any gaps or omissions. zz In the light of the services identified for inclusion in the strategy, to advise on whether other services might be appropriate for inclusion. zz To consider and advise on recommendations for the future. Our task, as we saw it, was to address the needs and opportunities of every child in Ireland from 0 to 6 years of age, encompassing the health of the mother during pregnancy. In this report, we set out the key themes that we have identified and we point to a wide range of supports and services that must be included in the strategy. Our recommendations are evidence-based, drawing on the reports presented to us by the Centre for Effective Services (included as Papers 1-5 in the Appendices to this report), as well as on other academic sources and on the knowledge and experience of the members of the group. If Ireland gets it ‘right from the start, by adopting a comprehensive Early Years Strategy for our children, with a serious commitment to implementation, we will end up with a generation of children, and successive generations, who are happier, healthier, safer, learning more, developing better and coping better with the adversity that life throws up. A comprehensive Early Years Strategy, backed up by national commitment, could shape a stronger and healthier society, and strengthen families. It could break cycles of poverty and disadvantage, and remove barriers of inequality. It could significantly reduce anti-social behaviour, dependency and alienation. It could help to build a stronger economy. The development and implementation of an Early Years Strategy could be the single most effective action on behalf of young children in Ireland in our lifetime. This report is our contribution to that process. A set of recommendations, of course, is not enough. If the people of Ireland really do want to change the future – to ensure that right from the start all our children have the best possible chance – that requires a major statement of political purpose and a radical re-orientation of structures, organisations, resources and policy priorities. 2 Right from the Start: Report of the Expert Advisory Group on the Early Years Strategy It cannot be done ‘on the cheap’ – but there is no investment that the Irish people could make that would pay more dividends. As the Expert Advisory Group began to work together, we asked ourselves some fundamental questions. What do we want for our children? What would success look like? What principles should underpin the strategy? What are the biggest policy gaps and deficits that need to be addressed? What are the key areas of universal provision? How can we build on these to support children with more complex or challenging needs? In this document, we set out our answers to these questions. We are conscious that our report to the Minister will form part of a wider process leading to a broader strategy for children and young people in Ireland, and we look forward to contributing to that debate too. The importance of having a policy for the youngest members of society is underlined by our large and growing early years population. We have over 480,000 children aged 0-6, representing 11% of the population (see Paper 1 in Appendices), including a significant number of children from different ethnicities. It is estimated that by 2021, the total number of children in this age group will have increased by 17%-20%. We have a responsibility to give our children the best possible start in life. What happens to children in their earliest years says much about the kind of nation we are.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherGovernment Publications, Dublinen_GB
dc.subjectYOUNG PEOPLEen_GB
dc.subjectCHILD HEALTHen_GB
dc.titleRight from the start: Report of the expert advisory group on the early years strategyen_GB
dc.typeReporten
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