Department of Children and Youth Affairs statement of strategy 2011-2014

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/311118
Title:
Department of Children and Youth Affairs statement of strategy 2011-2014
Authors:
Department of Children and Youth Affairs (DCYA)
Issue Date:
Mar-2012
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/311118
Item Type:
Report
Language:
en
Description:
The mission of the Department of Children and Youth Affairs (DCYA) is to lead the effort to improve outcomes for children and young people in Ireland. Our approach will be based on the best possible evidence of what works in meeting needs. Therefore, we will begin this Statement of Strategy by reviewing what the evidence currently tells us about children and young people in Ireland. Children and young people in Ireland The lives of children and young people, as well as the context in which they live, have changed significantly in recent years. Ireland’s comparatively young population combined with an increasing birth rate create an urgency around ensuring that services and supports to meet health, welfare, education and social needs are effective and efficient in supporting children’s outcomes. Findings from the biennial State of the Nation’s Children report and also from a range of national and international surveys such as Growing Up in Ireland provide important understandings of their lives. Key findings emerging include: • The great majority of children and young people in Ireland are healthy and there has been a notable decrease in both infant and child mortality rates over the last few years (OMCYA, 2010). There are, however, some areas of concern, such as levels of respiratory problems, obesity and mental health issues (Williams et al, 2009; Layte and McCrory, 2011). • Children in Ireland are doing well educationally compared with their international peers, although recent reports suggest literacy and numeracy levels have decreased (Perkins et al, 2010). • Most children live in supportive households where their parents adopt positive parenting styles (Halpenny et al, 2010). • Care and protection of vulnerable children remains an important issue and data from the Health Service Executive (HSE) show that on an annual basis nearly 27,000 child welfare and protection referrals are made to the HSE, with just under 2,000 cases confirmed as abuse and/or neglect (OMCYA, 2010). • Income matters and children in low income households are more likely to have higher levels of chronic ill health, to be overweight and obese, and to miss school more often compared with those in high income households (Williams et al, 2009; and Growing Up in Ireland, 2011a). • An analysis of deprivation by age group in 2009 and 2010 showed a significant increase in the deprivation rate for children (aged 0-17), which was 30.2% in 2010 compared to 23.5% in 2009 (CSO, 2011). Data from Growing Up in Ireland (2011b) show that almost two-thirds of all families with 3-year-old children reported that the recession has had a ‘very significant’ or ‘significant’ effect on them. • According to international surveys, children in Ireland are more likely to have friends and to spend time with them, to be happy and to take vigorous physical exercise; they are slightly less likely to smoke regularly compared with children from many other countries (Kelly et al, 2008). • Some other health findings are troubling, particularly in respect of alcohol and drug use (Haase and Pratschke, 2010). The health and social impacts of alcohol misuse on young people are well documented elsewhere (Newbury-Birch et al, 2009). There is also a significant relationship between alcohol and youth crime, and alcohol-related offences account for a significant proportion of referrals to the Juvenile Diversion Programme (OMCYA, 2010). • A recent study showed that children and young people in Ireland perform well above average in terms of their civic knowledge, ranking 7th across 38 countries (Cosgrove et al, 2010). In summary, there are a number of areas where children and young people in Ireland are doing well compared with their international peers. Some areas of concern continue to emerge and persist. The Department will be a key player in leading the effort to reinforce positive gains made to date and in improving outcomes for those children and young people whose development and life chances have been impaired by personal and social circumstances. The many dimensions of children’s lives cannot be adequately reflected within one department’s mandate. However, the DCYA is committed to using its direct service capability and its capacity in mobilising the efforts of others to bring about meaningful and positive change for children and young people.
Keywords:
YOUNG PEOPLE; CHILD HEALTH; HEALTH POLICY

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorDepartment of Children and Youth Affairs (DCYA)en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2014-01-09T11:42:35Z-
dc.date.available2014-01-09T11:42:35Z-
dc.date.issued2012-03-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/311118-
dc.descriptionThe mission of the Department of Children and Youth Affairs (DCYA) is to lead the effort to improve outcomes for children and young people in Ireland. Our approach will be based on the best possible evidence of what works in meeting needs. Therefore, we will begin this Statement of Strategy by reviewing what the evidence currently tells us about children and young people in Ireland. Children and young people in Ireland The lives of children and young people, as well as the context in which they live, have changed significantly in recent years. Ireland’s comparatively young population combined with an increasing birth rate create an urgency around ensuring that services and supports to meet health, welfare, education and social needs are effective and efficient in supporting children’s outcomes. Findings from the biennial State of the Nation’s Children report and also from a range of national and international surveys such as Growing Up in Ireland provide important understandings of their lives. Key findings emerging include: • The great majority of children and young people in Ireland are healthy and there has been a notable decrease in both infant and child mortality rates over the last few years (OMCYA, 2010). There are, however, some areas of concern, such as levels of respiratory problems, obesity and mental health issues (Williams et al, 2009; Layte and McCrory, 2011). • Children in Ireland are doing well educationally compared with their international peers, although recent reports suggest literacy and numeracy levels have decreased (Perkins et al, 2010). • Most children live in supportive households where their parents adopt positive parenting styles (Halpenny et al, 2010). • Care and protection of vulnerable children remains an important issue and data from the Health Service Executive (HSE) show that on an annual basis nearly 27,000 child welfare and protection referrals are made to the HSE, with just under 2,000 cases confirmed as abuse and/or neglect (OMCYA, 2010). • Income matters and children in low income households are more likely to have higher levels of chronic ill health, to be overweight and obese, and to miss school more often compared with those in high income households (Williams et al, 2009; and Growing Up in Ireland, 2011a). • An analysis of deprivation by age group in 2009 and 2010 showed a significant increase in the deprivation rate for children (aged 0-17), which was 30.2% in 2010 compared to 23.5% in 2009 (CSO, 2011). Data from Growing Up in Ireland (2011b) show that almost two-thirds of all families with 3-year-old children reported that the recession has had a ‘very significant’ or ‘significant’ effect on them. • According to international surveys, children in Ireland are more likely to have friends and to spend time with them, to be happy and to take vigorous physical exercise; they are slightly less likely to smoke regularly compared with children from many other countries (Kelly et al, 2008). • Some other health findings are troubling, particularly in respect of alcohol and drug use (Haase and Pratschke, 2010). The health and social impacts of alcohol misuse on young people are well documented elsewhere (Newbury-Birch et al, 2009). There is also a significant relationship between alcohol and youth crime, and alcohol-related offences account for a significant proportion of referrals to the Juvenile Diversion Programme (OMCYA, 2010). • A recent study showed that children and young people in Ireland perform well above average in terms of their civic knowledge, ranking 7th across 38 countries (Cosgrove et al, 2010). In summary, there are a number of areas where children and young people in Ireland are doing well compared with their international peers. Some areas of concern continue to emerge and persist. The Department will be a key player in leading the effort to reinforce positive gains made to date and in improving outcomes for those children and young people whose development and life chances have been impaired by personal and social circumstances. The many dimensions of children’s lives cannot be adequately reflected within one department’s mandate. However, the DCYA is committed to using its direct service capability and its capacity in mobilising the efforts of others to bring about meaningful and positive change for children and young people.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subjectYOUNG PEOPLEen_GB
dc.subjectCHILD HEALTHen_GB
dc.subjectHEALTH POLICYen_GB
dc.titleDepartment of Children and Youth Affairs statement of strategy 2011-2014en_GB
dc.typeReporten
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