Training and evaluation of psycho-social interventions

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/311109
Title:
Training and evaluation of psycho-social interventions
Authors:
Maruthu, Rajinikanth; MacLiam, Fionnula; Carroll, Geraldine
Affiliation:
Dublin South East Mental Health Services
Publisher:
Dublin South East Mental Health Services
Issue Date:
6-Jan-2014
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/311109
Item Type:
Report
Language:
en
Description:
Abstract: Training and Measuring the Level of Knowledge, Attitude, and Skills of Nurses on Psycho Social Interventions in Dublin South East Mental Health Services Dublin South East Mental Health Services believed that training nurses in psychosocial interventions would improve the quality of nursing and to enhance patient care. A curriculum was developed and was approved at category-I by the National Nursing and Midwifery Board. Training was conducted cost-effectively by rostering the nurses to the training days in such a way that services were not affected, and by utilizing the experienced trainers (also nurses) from within the service. The training was mainly emphasized the recovery approach, evidence based practice and utilised reflective practice as part of the training. The feedback received at the end of the training program was generally strongly positive. We undertook a study to understand the difference between the group of nurses who received the training and those who had not received the training,. A study tool to measure their level of knowledge, attitude, and skill was developed. The questionnaire consisted of 30 multiple choice questions based on training materials and several open ended questions. Ethical principles as outlined by the National Nursing and Midwifery Board were followed. A hundred nurses received the questionnaire. Twenty-three completed responses were received. Four nurses did not want to participate. Descriptive and inferential statistics were employed. There were no significant differences between the mean scores of the participants who had attended the training and the participants who had not attended the training. The participants those who were trained recently (in 2013) achieved the highest mean score; and the participants who trained in 2012 achieved a higher mean score than those who were trained in 2011. The majority of the participants responded that training in psychosocial interventions changed their nursing practice, but there were no significant differences between their mean scores. The majority of the participants responded that training on psychosocial interventions will help to develop their professional confidence and improve their nursing practice. The majority of the participants expressed that they wanted or required training in psychosocial interventions. It is significant that the participants who expressed that they do not require training on psychosocial interventions scored lower than the participants who require the training. The study has specific limitations which impede generalization. Giving information on evidence-based practice, clinical supervision, and focus group interviews are recommended to improve the training and to evaluate it.
Keywords:
MENTAL HEALTH; PROFESSIONAL EDUCATION AND DEVELOPMENT
Local subject classification:
Psycho-social Interventions

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorMaruthu, Rajinikanthen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMacLiam, Fionnulaen_GB
dc.contributor.authorCarroll, Geraldineen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2014-01-09T09:39:48Z-
dc.date.available2014-01-09T09:39:48Z-
dc.date.issued2014-01-06-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/311109-
dc.descriptionAbstract: Training and Measuring the Level of Knowledge, Attitude, and Skills of Nurses on Psycho Social Interventions in Dublin South East Mental Health Services Dublin South East Mental Health Services believed that training nurses in psychosocial interventions would improve the quality of nursing and to enhance patient care. A curriculum was developed and was approved at category-I by the National Nursing and Midwifery Board. Training was conducted cost-effectively by rostering the nurses to the training days in such a way that services were not affected, and by utilizing the experienced trainers (also nurses) from within the service. The training was mainly emphasized the recovery approach, evidence based practice and utilised reflective practice as part of the training. The feedback received at the end of the training program was generally strongly positive. We undertook a study to understand the difference between the group of nurses who received the training and those who had not received the training,. A study tool to measure their level of knowledge, attitude, and skill was developed. The questionnaire consisted of 30 multiple choice questions based on training materials and several open ended questions. Ethical principles as outlined by the National Nursing and Midwifery Board were followed. A hundred nurses received the questionnaire. Twenty-three completed responses were received. Four nurses did not want to participate. Descriptive and inferential statistics were employed. There were no significant differences between the mean scores of the participants who had attended the training and the participants who had not attended the training. The participants those who were trained recently (in 2013) achieved the highest mean score; and the participants who trained in 2012 achieved a higher mean score than those who were trained in 2011. The majority of the participants responded that training in psychosocial interventions changed their nursing practice, but there were no significant differences between their mean scores. The majority of the participants responded that training on psychosocial interventions will help to develop their professional confidence and improve their nursing practice. The majority of the participants expressed that they wanted or required training in psychosocial interventions. It is significant that the participants who expressed that they do not require training on psychosocial interventions scored lower than the participants who require the training. The study has specific limitations which impede generalization. Giving information on evidence-based practice, clinical supervision, and focus group interviews are recommended to improve the training and to evaluate it.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherDublin South East Mental Health Servicesen_GB
dc.subjectMENTAL HEALTHen_GB
dc.subjectPROFESSIONAL EDUCATION AND DEVELOPMENTen_GB
dc.subject.otherPsycho-social Interventionsen_GB
dc.titleTraining and evaluation of psycho-social interventionsen_GB
dc.typeReporten
dc.contributor.departmentDublin South East Mental Health Servicesen_GB
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