Irish Heart Foundation position statement on salt, blood pressure and heart disease

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/310944
Title:
Irish Heart Foundation position statement on salt, blood pressure and heart disease
Authors:
Irish Heart Foundation (IHF)
Publisher:
Irish Heart Foundation (IHF)
Issue Date:
Apr-2004
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/310944
Item Type:
Other
Language:
en
Description:
stroke and related diseases of blood vessels.1, 2 CVD the single largest cause of death in Ireland 3. There is now convincing evidence that sodium intake, mainly through dietary salt (sodium chloride), is directly associated with blood pressure. 1,2, 4,5 The association is stronger in those with hypertension (raised blood pressure) and in older and black individuals. Until recently population-wide strategies to reduce salt consumption were challenged because of lack of evidence that such an approach would lower blood pressure in people with hypertension. However, the evidence is building that on a population-wide basis, a relatively modest reduction in salt intake has important beneficial effects on blood pressure in hypertensive and normotensive individuals. This would produce substantial falls in stroke and coronary heart disease mortality. 6,7 For example it is estimated that in Ireland an average reduction of systolic blood pressure of 5 mmHg, achieved by a reduction in salt consumption of 3 grams per day, would reduce the incidence of stroke by 13% and the incidence of coronary heart disease by 10%.8,9 This would amount to approximately 900 deaths per year, with commensurate falls in the number of people developing either heart attack or stroke. The World Health Organization, as well as many international health organisations, has called for strong public health measures to tackle excess salt consumption.1 Research shows that a healthy balanced diet, low in salt and rich in fruit, vegetables and low-fat dairy products can help reduce high blood pressure levels.6
Keywords:
CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASE; NUTRITION

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorIrish Heart Foundation (IHF)en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2014-01-06T16:14:19Z-
dc.date.available2014-01-06T16:14:19Z-
dc.date.issued2004-04-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/310944-
dc.descriptionstroke and related diseases of blood vessels.1, 2 CVD the single largest cause of death in Ireland 3. There is now convincing evidence that sodium intake, mainly through dietary salt (sodium chloride), is directly associated with blood pressure. 1,2, 4,5 The association is stronger in those with hypertension (raised blood pressure) and in older and black individuals. Until recently population-wide strategies to reduce salt consumption were challenged because of lack of evidence that such an approach would lower blood pressure in people with hypertension. However, the evidence is building that on a population-wide basis, a relatively modest reduction in salt intake has important beneficial effects on blood pressure in hypertensive and normotensive individuals. This would produce substantial falls in stroke and coronary heart disease mortality. 6,7 For example it is estimated that in Ireland an average reduction of systolic blood pressure of 5 mmHg, achieved by a reduction in salt consumption of 3 grams per day, would reduce the incidence of stroke by 13% and the incidence of coronary heart disease by 10%.8,9 This would amount to approximately 900 deaths per year, with commensurate falls in the number of people developing either heart attack or stroke. The World Health Organization, as well as many international health organisations, has called for strong public health measures to tackle excess salt consumption.1 Research shows that a healthy balanced diet, low in salt and rich in fruit, vegetables and low-fat dairy products can help reduce high blood pressure levels.6en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherIrish Heart Foundation (IHF)en_GB
dc.subjectCARDIOVASCULAR DISEASEen_GB
dc.subjectNUTRITIONen_GB
dc.titleIrish Heart Foundation position statement on salt, blood pressure and heart diseaseen_GB
dc.typeOtheren
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