Primary care and youth mental health in Ireland: qualitative study in deprived urban areas

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/310937
Title:
Primary care and youth mental health in Ireland: qualitative study in deprived urban areas
Authors:
Leahy, Dorothy; Schaffalitzky, Elisabeth; Armstrong, Claire; Bury, Gerard; Cussen-Murphy, Paula; Davis, Rachel; Dooley, Barbara; Gavin, Blanaid; Keane, Rory; Keenan, Eamon; Latham, Linda; Meagher, David; McGorry, Pat; McNicholas, Fiona; O’Connor, Ray; O’Dea, Ellen; O’Keane, Veronica; O’Toole, Tom P; Reilly, Edel; Ryan, Patrick; Sanci, Lena; Smyth, Bobby P; Cullen, Walter
Citation:
BMC Family Practice. 2013 Dec 17;14(1):194
Issue Date:
17-Dec-2013
URI:
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1471-2296-14-194; http://hdl.handle.net/10147/310937
Abstract:
Abstract Background Mental disorders account for six of the 20 leading causes of disability worldwide with a very high prevalence of psychiatric morbidity in youth aged 15–24 years. However, healthcare professionals are faced with many challenges in the identification and treatment of mental and substance use disorders in young people (e.g. young people’s unwillingness to seek help from healthcare professionals, lack of training, limited resources etc.) The challenge of youth mental health for primary care is especially evident in urban deprived areas, where rates of and risk factors for mental health problems are especially common. There is an emerging consensus that primary care is well placed to address mental and substance use disorders in young people especially in deprived urban areas. This study aims to describe healthcare professionals’ experience and attitudes towards screening and early intervention for mental and substance use disorders among young people (16–25 years) in primary care in deprived urban settings in Ireland. Methods The chosen method for this qualitative study was inductive thematic analysis which involved semi-structured interviews with 37 healthcare professionals from primary care, secondary care and community agencies at two deprived urban centres. Results We identified three themes in respect of interventions to increase screening and treatment: (1) Identification is optimised by a range of strategies, including raising awareness, training, more systematic and formalised assessment, and youth-friendly practices (e.g. communication skills, ensuring confidentiality); (2) Treatment is enhanced by closer inter-agency collaboration and training for all healthcare professionals working in primary care; (3) Ongoing engagement is enhanced by motivational work with young people, setting achievable treatment goals, supporting transition between child and adult mental health services and recognising primary care’s longitudinal nature as a key asset in promoting treatment engagement. Conclusions Especially in deprived areas, primary care is central to early intervention for youth mental health. Identification, treatment and continuing engagement are likely to be enhanced by a range of strategies with young people, healthcare professionals and systems. Further research on youth mental health and primary care, including qualitative accounts of young people’s experience and developing complex interventions that promote early intervention are priorities. (350 words)
Language:
en
Keywords:
MENTAL HEALTH; SOCIAL EXCLUSION; YOUNG PEOPLE

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorLeahy, Dorothyen_GB
dc.contributor.authorSchaffalitzky, Elisabethen_GB
dc.contributor.authorArmstrong, Claireen_GB
dc.contributor.authorBury, Gerarden_GB
dc.contributor.authorCussen-Murphy, Paulaen_GB
dc.contributor.authorDavis, Rachelen_GB
dc.contributor.authorDooley, Barbaraen_GB
dc.contributor.authorGavin, Blanaiden_GB
dc.contributor.authorKeane, Roryen_GB
dc.contributor.authorKeenan, Eamonen_GB
dc.contributor.authorLatham, Lindaen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMeagher, Daviden_GB
dc.contributor.authorMcGorry, Paten_GB
dc.contributor.authorMcNicholas, Fionaen_GB
dc.contributor.authorO’Connor, Rayen_GB
dc.contributor.authorO’Dea, Ellenen_GB
dc.contributor.authorO’Keane, Veronicaen_GB
dc.contributor.authorO’Toole, Tom Pen_GB
dc.contributor.authorReilly, Edelen_GB
dc.contributor.authorRyan, Patricken_GB
dc.contributor.authorSanci, Lenaen_GB
dc.contributor.authorSmyth, Bobby Pen_GB
dc.contributor.authorCullen, Walteren_GB
dc.date.accessioned2014-01-06T16:37:50Z-
dc.date.available2014-01-06T16:37:50Z-
dc.date.issued2013-12-17-
dc.identifier.citationBMC Family Practice. 2013 Dec 17;14(1):194en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1471-2296-14-194-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/310937-
dc.description.abstractAbstract Background Mental disorders account for six of the 20 leading causes of disability worldwide with a very high prevalence of psychiatric morbidity in youth aged 15–24 years. However, healthcare professionals are faced with many challenges in the identification and treatment of mental and substance use disorders in young people (e.g. young people’s unwillingness to seek help from healthcare professionals, lack of training, limited resources etc.) The challenge of youth mental health for primary care is especially evident in urban deprived areas, where rates of and risk factors for mental health problems are especially common. There is an emerging consensus that primary care is well placed to address mental and substance use disorders in young people especially in deprived urban areas. This study aims to describe healthcare professionals’ experience and attitudes towards screening and early intervention for mental and substance use disorders among young people (16–25 years) in primary care in deprived urban settings in Ireland. Methods The chosen method for this qualitative study was inductive thematic analysis which involved semi-structured interviews with 37 healthcare professionals from primary care, secondary care and community agencies at two deprived urban centres. Results We identified three themes in respect of interventions to increase screening and treatment: (1) Identification is optimised by a range of strategies, including raising awareness, training, more systematic and formalised assessment, and youth-friendly practices (e.g. communication skills, ensuring confidentiality); (2) Treatment is enhanced by closer inter-agency collaboration and training for all healthcare professionals working in primary care; (3) Ongoing engagement is enhanced by motivational work with young people, setting achievable treatment goals, supporting transition between child and adult mental health services and recognising primary care’s longitudinal nature as a key asset in promoting treatment engagement. Conclusions Especially in deprived areas, primary care is central to early intervention for youth mental health. Identification, treatment and continuing engagement are likely to be enhanced by a range of strategies with young people, healthcare professionals and systems. Further research on youth mental health and primary care, including qualitative accounts of young people’s experience and developing complex interventions that promote early intervention are priorities. (350 words)-
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subjectMENTAL HEALTHen_GB
dc.subjectSOCIAL EXCLUSIONen_GB
dc.subjectYOUNG PEOPLEen_GB
dc.titlePrimary care and youth mental health in Ireland: qualitative study in deprived urban areasen_GB
dc.language.rfc3066en-
dc.rights.holderDorothy Leahy et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.-
dc.description.statusPeer Reviewed-
dc.date.updated2014-01-04T01:37:28Z-
All Items in Lenus, The Irish Health Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.