Preventing cardiovascular disease: statement on childhood nutrition: a resource for health professionals

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/310936
Title:
Preventing cardiovascular disease: statement on childhood nutrition: a resource for health professionals
Authors:
Council on Nutrition, Irish Heart Foundation; National Heart Alliance; European Heart Health Initiative
Publisher:
Irish Heart Foundation (IHF)
Issue Date:
Apr-2002
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/310936
Item Type:
Other
Language:
en
Description:
Coronary heart disease death rates for men and women in Ireland are the highest among European Union countries and while these death rates have been decreasing over the past 30 years, the evidence suggests that Ireland has not enjoyed the same decline in overall death rates as other EU states (Cardiovascular Health Strategy Group, 1999). Over the next 30 years, atherosclerotic cardiovascular diseases (CVD), including heart attack and stroke, will remain the biggest single cause of death in western populations (Murray & Lopez, 1997). While guidelines on CVD prevention have tended to focus on the lifestyle habits of adults (Krauss et al. 2000; Wood et al. 1998), it is now widely appreciated that while the symptoms of heart attack and stroke become obvious in adulthood, the underlying process begins much earlier in childhood (Fischer et al. 1997). Communicating advice on nutrition is essential to the implementation of CVD prevention and because lifelong dietary habits are established in childhood (Kelder et al.,1994; Elbon et al., 1996), it is logical to promote healthful dietary behaviour patterns among children to prevent future CVD. The nutrition and dietary habits of children are complex and drawing up consensus guidelines may pose difficulties. For instance, an overly zealous interpretation of general guidelines by health-conscious individuals may be harmful (Peterson & Sigman-Grant, 1997). In addition, concerns may arise if the nutrient content of the recommended diet differs from the traditional diet, or, in the case of fat intake, if the energy and developmental needs of children are not met (Wardley et al., 1997). These concerns have been considered while drawing up this statement which is intended as a resource for health professionals who are involved in health promotion with young, ostensibly healthy people and does not apply to specific groups with special nutritional needs. Most of the literature reviewed in drawing up this statement refers to non-Irish populations but, wherever possible, Irish research data have been cited. For the purpose of definition, the term “childhood” refers to between age two and eighteen years, however given the relevance to CVD, some recommendations for under two years in relation to breastfeeding are included. Finally, cardiovascular disease is multi-factorial and, as outlined below, for CVD prevention to succeed, advice on childhood nutrition should not be considered in isolation from other lifestyle issues, such as physical activity and tobacco smoking.
Keywords:
CHILD NUTRITION; CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASE

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorCouncil on Nutrition, Irish Heart Foundationen_GB
dc.contributor.authorNational Heart Allianceen_GB
dc.contributor.authorEuropean Heart Health Initiativeen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2014-01-06T16:27:29Z-
dc.date.available2014-01-06T16:27:29Z-
dc.date.issued2002-04-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/310936-
dc.descriptionCoronary heart disease death rates for men and women in Ireland are the highest among European Union countries and while these death rates have been decreasing over the past 30 years, the evidence suggests that Ireland has not enjoyed the same decline in overall death rates as other EU states (Cardiovascular Health Strategy Group, 1999). Over the next 30 years, atherosclerotic cardiovascular diseases (CVD), including heart attack and stroke, will remain the biggest single cause of death in western populations (Murray & Lopez, 1997). While guidelines on CVD prevention have tended to focus on the lifestyle habits of adults (Krauss et al. 2000; Wood et al. 1998), it is now widely appreciated that while the symptoms of heart attack and stroke become obvious in adulthood, the underlying process begins much earlier in childhood (Fischer et al. 1997). Communicating advice on nutrition is essential to the implementation of CVD prevention and because lifelong dietary habits are established in childhood (Kelder et al.,1994; Elbon et al., 1996), it is logical to promote healthful dietary behaviour patterns among children to prevent future CVD. The nutrition and dietary habits of children are complex and drawing up consensus guidelines may pose difficulties. For instance, an overly zealous interpretation of general guidelines by health-conscious individuals may be harmful (Peterson & Sigman-Grant, 1997). In addition, concerns may arise if the nutrient content of the recommended diet differs from the traditional diet, or, in the case of fat intake, if the energy and developmental needs of children are not met (Wardley et al., 1997). These concerns have been considered while drawing up this statement which is intended as a resource for health professionals who are involved in health promotion with young, ostensibly healthy people and does not apply to specific groups with special nutritional needs. Most of the literature reviewed in drawing up this statement refers to non-Irish populations but, wherever possible, Irish research data have been cited. For the purpose of definition, the term “childhood” refers to between age two and eighteen years, however given the relevance to CVD, some recommendations for under two years in relation to breastfeeding are included. Finally, cardiovascular disease is multi-factorial and, as outlined below, for CVD prevention to succeed, advice on childhood nutrition should not be considered in isolation from other lifestyle issues, such as physical activity and tobacco smoking.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherIrish Heart Foundation (IHF)en_GB
dc.subjectCHILD NUTRITIONen_GB
dc.subjectCARDIOVASCULAR DISEASEen_GB
dc.titlePreventing cardiovascular disease: statement on childhood nutrition: a resource for health professionalsen_GB
dc.typeOtheren
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