Planning for the Future Project: initiating ‘end of life’ discussions for people with dementia

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/310919
Title:
Planning for the Future Project: initiating ‘end of life’ discussions for people with dementia
Authors:
Hayden, Cecelia; Parke, Muriel; Lynch, Marie; Kelly, Siobhan
Affiliation:
St. Vincent’s Hospital, Athy and St. Brigid’s Hospice
Publisher:
Irish Hospice Foundation
Issue Date:
Sep-2013
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/310919
Item Type:
Report
Language:
en
Description:
The term dementia is used to describe a collection of symptoms including a decline in memory, communication skills, reasoning and gradual loss of skills needed to carry out daily activities (NICE guidelines 2007). A person with dementia may demonstrate acute sensitivity to his or her social environment and a high level of stress. Dementia is a life-limiting condition and the person will, in general, undergo a gradual and progressive deterioration in their symptoms. In Ireland there are currently over 41,000 people living with dementia, and this number is projected to increase to over 140,580 by 2041 (Cahill et al., 2012). It is estimated that at least 40% of people with dementia are currently in residential care in Ireland and 18% of acute medical beds are occupied by people with dementia (O’Shea, 2007). Palliative care is concerned with “the quality of life of patients and families who face life-threatening illness, by providing pain and symptom relief, spiritual and psychosocial support from diagnosis to the end of life and bereavement” (WHO, 2007). The need to provide high quality end-of-life care is essential. The needs of dying people may include, but are not limited to, knowing when death is coming, understanding what can be expected, being able to maintain a sense of control, giving preference to their wishes, having access to information, spiritual and emotional support as required (Palliative Care for All, 2008). People must have the opportunity to discuss their wishes and choices regarding end of life care. Where decisions on such matters cannot be made due to diminished or absence of capacity, his/her representative should be consulted (HIQA 2009). Obstacles to quality end-of-life care have also been identified in the literature and may include failure to recognise treatment futility, lack of communication among decision makers, no agreement on a course for end-of-life care, and failure to implement a timely end-of-life care plan (Travis et al. 2002).
Keywords:
HOSPICE; DEMENTIA; PALLIATIVE CARE

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorHayden, Ceceliaen_GB
dc.contributor.authorParke, Murielen_GB
dc.contributor.authorLynch, Marieen_GB
dc.contributor.authorKelly, Siobhanen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2014-01-06T16:02:43Z-
dc.date.available2014-01-06T16:02:43Z-
dc.date.issued2013-09-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/310919-
dc.descriptionThe term dementia is used to describe a collection of symptoms including a decline in memory, communication skills, reasoning and gradual loss of skills needed to carry out daily activities (NICE guidelines 2007). A person with dementia may demonstrate acute sensitivity to his or her social environment and a high level of stress. Dementia is a life-limiting condition and the person will, in general, undergo a gradual and progressive deterioration in their symptoms. In Ireland there are currently over 41,000 people living with dementia, and this number is projected to increase to over 140,580 by 2041 (Cahill et al., 2012). It is estimated that at least 40% of people with dementia are currently in residential care in Ireland and 18% of acute medical beds are occupied by people with dementia (O’Shea, 2007). Palliative care is concerned with “the quality of life of patients and families who face life-threatening illness, by providing pain and symptom relief, spiritual and psychosocial support from diagnosis to the end of life and bereavement” (WHO, 2007). The need to provide high quality end-of-life care is essential. The needs of dying people may include, but are not limited to, knowing when death is coming, understanding what can be expected, being able to maintain a sense of control, giving preference to their wishes, having access to information, spiritual and emotional support as required (Palliative Care for All, 2008). People must have the opportunity to discuss their wishes and choices regarding end of life care. Where decisions on such matters cannot be made due to diminished or absence of capacity, his/her representative should be consulted (HIQA 2009). Obstacles to quality end-of-life care have also been identified in the literature and may include failure to recognise treatment futility, lack of communication among decision makers, no agreement on a course for end-of-life care, and failure to implement a timely end-of-life care plan (Travis et al. 2002).en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherIrish Hospice Foundationen_GB
dc.subjectHOSPICEen_GB
dc.subjectDEMENTIAen_GB
dc.subjectPALLIATIVE CAREen_GB
dc.titlePlanning for the Future Project: initiating ‘end of life’ discussions for people with dementiaen_GB
dc.typeReporten
dc.contributor.departmentSt. Vincent’s Hospital, Athy and St. Brigid’s Hospiceen_GB
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