Practice nurses and social media – how to avoid hidden pitfalls

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/308949
Title:
Practice nurses and social media – how to avoid hidden pitfalls
Authors:
Nolan, Lisa
Publisher:
Nursing in General Practice
Journal:
Nursing in general practice
Issue Date:
Nov-2013
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/308949
Item Type:
Article
Language:
en
Description:
While time is certainly an issue for many, a significant number of people remain intensely distrustful of social media. Worries about invasion of privacy, concern about personal security (particularly in relation to children) and fear of cyber-bullying are all valid reasons to steer clear. Nurses face a whole host of additional risks if they are active on social media sites: professionalism, ensuring appropriate nurse/patient relationships, legal/moral/ethical issues, being seen to give medical advice and maintaining patient confidentiality are all issues that should be considered. We are used to maintaining patient confidentiality in the ‘real’ world. It was drummed into us during our training and for the most part is, thankfully, normal practice in healthcare settings. Talking about patients in lifts, corridors or the car park instinctively feels wrong so our default habit is to avoid it at all costs. Customs and practices related to patient privacy in healthcare settings are pretty much set in stone now.
Keywords:
NURSING; INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY
Local subject classification:
SOCIAL MEDIA

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorNolan, Lisaen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2013-12-23T14:48:54Z-
dc.date.available2013-12-23T14:48:54Z-
dc.date.issued2013-11-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/308949-
dc.descriptionWhile time is certainly an issue for many, a significant number of people remain intensely distrustful of social media. Worries about invasion of privacy, concern about personal security (particularly in relation to children) and fear of cyber-bullying are all valid reasons to steer clear. Nurses face a whole host of additional risks if they are active on social media sites: professionalism, ensuring appropriate nurse/patient relationships, legal/moral/ethical issues, being seen to give medical advice and maintaining patient confidentiality are all issues that should be considered. We are used to maintaining patient confidentiality in the ‘real’ world. It was drummed into us during our training and for the most part is, thankfully, normal practice in healthcare settings. Talking about patients in lifts, corridors or the car park instinctively feels wrong so our default habit is to avoid it at all costs. Customs and practices related to patient privacy in healthcare settings are pretty much set in stone now.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherNursing in General Practiceen_GB
dc.subjectNURSINGen_GB
dc.subjectINFORMATION TECHNOLOGYen_GB
dc.subject.otherSOCIAL MEDIAen_GB
dc.titlePractice nurses and social media – how to avoid hidden pitfallsen_GB
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalNursing in general practiceen_GB
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