Gastro-oesophageal reflux disease in the paediatric patient with disability

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/308944
Title:
Gastro-oesophageal reflux disease in the paediatric patient with disability
Authors:
Flood, Caroline
Publisher:
Nursing in General Practice
Journal:
Nursing in general practice
Issue Date:
Nov-2013
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/308944
Item Type:
Article
Language:
en
Description:
Symptoms of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD) are frequently observed in children with developmental disability.1,2 Gastro-oesophageal reflux (GOR) refers to the passage of gastric contents into the oesophagus, with or without regurgitation and vomiting, and is considered a normal physiological process. 3 Conversely, GORD, refers to the troublesome symptoms and/or complications that develop secondary to persistent GOR.3 Children with developmental disability are at increased risk of developing GORD and generally experience a greater number of complications associated with the disease than their otherwise healthy counterparts.4 Thickening feeds represents one means by which symptoms of the disease may be managed in children,5 however, there is limited evidence to support this line of treatment in those with cerebral palsy, epilepsy, autism spectrum disorder and other forms of developmental disability. The potential side-effects associated with long-term use of feed thickeners should not be overlooked and the financial implications of their use in enteral feeds requires consideration. A lack of published recommendations and national guidelines for managing this patient group has led to variance in practice between dietitians who treat such children in Ireland.
Keywords:
DIGESTIVE TRACT DISEASES

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorFlood, Carolineen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2013-12-23T14:29:09Z-
dc.date.available2013-12-23T14:29:09Z-
dc.date.issued2013-11-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/308944-
dc.descriptionSymptoms of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD) are frequently observed in children with developmental disability.1,2 Gastro-oesophageal reflux (GOR) refers to the passage of gastric contents into the oesophagus, with or without regurgitation and vomiting, and is considered a normal physiological process. 3 Conversely, GORD, refers to the troublesome symptoms and/or complications that develop secondary to persistent GOR.3 Children with developmental disability are at increased risk of developing GORD and generally experience a greater number of complications associated with the disease than their otherwise healthy counterparts.4 Thickening feeds represents one means by which symptoms of the disease may be managed in children,5 however, there is limited evidence to support this line of treatment in those with cerebral palsy, epilepsy, autism spectrum disorder and other forms of developmental disability. The potential side-effects associated with long-term use of feed thickeners should not be overlooked and the financial implications of their use in enteral feeds requires consideration. A lack of published recommendations and national guidelines for managing this patient group has led to variance in practice between dietitians who treat such children in Ireland.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherNursing in General Practiceen_GB
dc.subjectDIGESTIVE TRACT DISEASES-
dc.titleGastro-oesophageal reflux disease in the paediatric patient with disabilityen_GB
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalNursing in general practiceen_GB
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