Is the NCHD changeover associated with increased risk of intravenous catheter related infections?

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/307040
Title:
Is the NCHD changeover associated with increased risk of intravenous catheter related infections?
Authors:
Craven, B
Affiliation:
Clinical Science Institute, Costello Road, Galway
Publisher:
Irish Medical Journal (IMJ)
Journal:
Irish Medical Journal (IMJ)
Issue Date:
Dec-2013
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/307040
Item Type:
Article
Language:
en
Description:
Both central venous catheters (CVCs) and peripheral intravenous cannulas (PVCs) have changed the management of patient care in a hospital setting. However there is a significant risk of local and/or blood stream infection with both1,2. Indeed, every day the catheters remain in place increases the chances of developing a related blood stream infection3. Healthcare associated infections (HCAIs) lead to increased morbidity and mortality, increased length of hospital stay and costs4. HCAIs are an important indicator of quality of care. Our hypothesis was that the non consultant hospital doctor changeover at the beginning of July may be associated with some impact on these quality indicators. The primary aim of this study was to monitor the rates of CVC associated infections in a 649 bed teaching hospital for twenty days before and after the changeover. Secondary aims included monitoring of PVC related adverse events and blood culture contamination rates before and after the changeover.
Keywords:
INFECTION CONTROL; HOSPITALS
Local subject classification:
MEDICAL EQUIPMENT

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorCraven, Ben_GB
dc.date.accessioned2013-12-18T12:27:14Z-
dc.date.available2013-12-18T12:27:14Z-
dc.date.issued2013-12-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/307040-
dc.descriptionBoth central venous catheters (CVCs) and peripheral intravenous cannulas (PVCs) have changed the management of patient care in a hospital setting. However there is a significant risk of local and/or blood stream infection with both1,2. Indeed, every day the catheters remain in place increases the chances of developing a related blood stream infection3. Healthcare associated infections (HCAIs) lead to increased morbidity and mortality, increased length of hospital stay and costs4. HCAIs are an important indicator of quality of care. Our hypothesis was that the non consultant hospital doctor changeover at the beginning of July may be associated with some impact on these quality indicators. The primary aim of this study was to monitor the rates of CVC associated infections in a 649 bed teaching hospital for twenty days before and after the changeover. Secondary aims included monitoring of PVC related adverse events and blood culture contamination rates before and after the changeover.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherIrish Medical Journal (IMJ)en_GB
dc.subjectINFECTION CONTROLen_GB
dc.subjectHOSPITALSen_GB
dc.subject.otherMEDICAL EQUIPMENTen_GB
dc.titleIs the NCHD changeover associated with increased risk of intravenous catheter related infections?en_GB
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentClinical Science Institute, Costello Road, Galwayen_GB
dc.identifier.journalIrish Medical Journal (IMJ)en_GB
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