Hepatitis C virus-associated thrombocytopenia in pregnancy: impact upon multidisciplinary care provision.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/306891
Title:
Hepatitis C virus-associated thrombocytopenia in pregnancy: impact upon multidisciplinary care provision.
Authors:
Monteith, Cathy; Ní Ainle, Fionnuala; Cooley, Sharon; Lambert, John S; Kelleher, Barry; Jackson, Valerie; Eogan, Maeve
Affiliation:
Rotunda Hospital Dublin
Citation:
Hepatitis C virus-associated thrombocytopenia in pregnancy: impact upon multidisciplinary care provision. 2014, 42 (1):135-8 J Perinat Med
Journal:
Journal of perinatal medicine
Issue Date:
1-Jan-2014
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/306891
DOI:
10.1515/jpm-2013-0080
PubMed ID:
24006316
Abstract:
Abstract Objective: Recent studies have implicated hepatitis C virus (HCV) in the pathogenesis of immune thrombocytopenia. In pregnancy-associated immune thrombocytopenia, multidisciplinary management is required due to a potential for bleeding complications. We performed a retrospective review of HCV-infected pregnant women and age-matched controls who were not infected with HCV. Methods: One hundred and six women with a HCV viral load were identified from 2009 to 2011. Results: Thrombocytopenia was identified in 10.3% of HCV-infected pregnant women and 1.6% of age-matched controls (P<0.001). Mean platelet count during pregnancy was 120±23×109/L in HCV-infected women and at delivery was significantly lower in HCV-infected women than in controls (P=0.01). Despite the significant difference in platelet counts, there was no significant difference in estimated blood loss (EBL) at delivery. Regional anaesthesia was performed in 73% of thrombocytopenic HCV-infected women and no complications were recorded. There were no fetal bleeding complications. Conclusion: In the first study to date to investigate the impact of HCV on maternal platelet count we demonstrated a significantly higher frequency of thrombocytopenia and a significantly lower platelet count in HCV-infected pregnant women compared with controls. Interestingly, thrombocytopenia had no detectable impact on EBL at delivery.
Item Type:
Article In Press
Language:
en
Keywords:
HEPATITIS C; PREGNANCY
Local subject classification:
THROMBOCYTOPENIA
ISSN:
1619-3997

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorMonteith, Cathyen_GB
dc.contributor.authorNí Ainle, Fionnualaen_GB
dc.contributor.authorCooley, Sharonen_GB
dc.contributor.authorLambert, John Sen_GB
dc.contributor.authorKelleher, Barryen_GB
dc.contributor.authorJackson, Valerieen_GB
dc.contributor.authorEogan, Maeveen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2013-12-16T15:55:26Z-
dc.date.available2013-12-16T15:55:26Z-
dc.date.issued2014-01-01-
dc.identifier.citationHepatitis C virus-associated thrombocytopenia in pregnancy: impact upon multidisciplinary care provision. 2014, 42 (1):135-8 J Perinat Meden_GB
dc.identifier.issn1619-3997-
dc.identifier.pmid24006316-
dc.identifier.doi10.1515/jpm-2013-0080-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/306891-
dc.description.abstractAbstract Objective: Recent studies have implicated hepatitis C virus (HCV) in the pathogenesis of immune thrombocytopenia. In pregnancy-associated immune thrombocytopenia, multidisciplinary management is required due to a potential for bleeding complications. We performed a retrospective review of HCV-infected pregnant women and age-matched controls who were not infected with HCV. Methods: One hundred and six women with a HCV viral load were identified from 2009 to 2011. Results: Thrombocytopenia was identified in 10.3% of HCV-infected pregnant women and 1.6% of age-matched controls (P<0.001). Mean platelet count during pregnancy was 120±23×109/L in HCV-infected women and at delivery was significantly lower in HCV-infected women than in controls (P=0.01). Despite the significant difference in platelet counts, there was no significant difference in estimated blood loss (EBL) at delivery. Regional anaesthesia was performed in 73% of thrombocytopenic HCV-infected women and no complications were recorded. There were no fetal bleeding complications. Conclusion: In the first study to date to investigate the impact of HCV on maternal platelet count we demonstrated a significantly higher frequency of thrombocytopenia and a significantly lower platelet count in HCV-infected pregnant women compared with controls. Interestingly, thrombocytopenia had no detectable impact on EBL at delivery.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Journal of perinatal medicineen_GB
dc.subjectHEPATITIS Cen_GB
dc.subjectPREGNANCYen_GB
dc.subject.otherTHROMBOCYTOPENIAen_GB
dc.titleHepatitis C virus-associated thrombocytopenia in pregnancy: impact upon multidisciplinary care provision.en_GB
dc.typeArticle In Pressen
dc.contributor.departmentRotunda Hospital Dublinen_GB
dc.identifier.journalJournal of perinatal medicineen_GB
dc.description.fundingOtheren
dc.description.provinceLeinsteren
dc.description.peer-reviewpeer-reviewen

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