Methods of recording theatre activity across publicly funded hospitals in Ireland.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/306082
Title:
Methods of recording theatre activity across publicly funded hospitals in Ireland.
Authors:
Cronin, J; Healy, O; Hegarty, H; Murray, D
Affiliation:
Department of Public Health, Health Service Executive, Cork, Ireland, judy.cronin@hse.ie.
Citation:
Methods of recording theatre activity across publicly funded hospitals in Ireland. 2013: Ir J Med Sci
Journal:
Irish journal of medical science
Issue Date:
13-Oct-2013
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/306082
DOI:
10.1007/s11845-013-1030-y
PubMed ID:
24122130
Abstract:
A review of theatre activity in all Health Service Executive (HSE) hospitals in Cork and Kerry in 2008 required a manual extraction of theatre activity data from largely paper-based logbooks. A key data management recommendation suggested that "a standardised computerised theatre logbook system be developed in all hospitals in the region". HSE (2010) Reconfiguration of health services for Cork and Kerry-theatre utilisation review. ISBN 978-1-906218-54-6.; In 2010, a computerised minimum dataset project group conducted a telephone survey of theatre managers nationally to determine the methods of recording theatre activity across publicly funded hospital theatres in Ireland.; Sixty-one percent of acute hospitals nationally did not have a computerised theatre register. Of those who did, 15 % had a fully electronic system, 13 % had a dual paper-based and electronic system and 7 % had a single surgical specialty system. The HSE South region was significantly deprived of an electronic operating system in comparison to other HSE regions. While the total number of fully computerised hospital theatres remained small, they still dealt with the greater number of hospital discharges nationally.; The roll-out of the productive operating theatre programme is facilitating the implementation of operating room management systems on a phased basis nationally. This will greatly facilitate audit, research, patient care and theatre efficiencies.
Description:
BACKGROUND: A review of theatre activity in all Health Service Executive (HSE) hospitals in Cork and Kerry in 2008 required a manual extraction of theatre activity data from largely paper-based logbooks. A key data management recommendation suggested that "a standardised computerised theatre logbook system be developed in all hospitals in the region". HSE (2010) Reconfiguration of health services for Cork and Kerry-theatre utilisation review. ISBN 978-1-906218-54-6. MATERIALS AND METHODS: In 2010, a computerised minimum dataset project group conducted a telephone survey of theatre managers nationally to determine the methods of recording theatre activity across publicly funded hospital theatres in Ireland. RESULTS: Sixty-one percent of acute hospitals nationally did not have a computerised theatre register. Of those who did, 15 % had a fully electronic system, 13 % had a dual paper-based and electronic system and 7 % had a single surgical specialty system. The HSE South region was significantly deprived of an electronic operating system in comparison to other HSE regions. While the total number of fully computerised hospital theatres remained small, they still dealt with the greater number of hospital discharges nationally. CONCLUSIONS: The roll-out of the productive operating theatre programme is facilitating the implementation of operating room management systems on a phased basis nationally. This will greatly facilitate audit, research, patient care and theatre efficiencies.
Local subject classification:
PUBLIC HEALTH DEPARTMENT; HEALTH SERVICE PLANNING; OPERATING THEATRE; COMPUTERISATION; THEATRE ACTIVITY; INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY; PRODUCTIVE OPERATING THEATRE
ISSN:
1863-4362

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorCronin, Jen_GB
dc.contributor.authorHealy, Oen_GB
dc.contributor.authorHegarty, Hen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMurray, Den_GB
dc.date.accessioned2013-12-02T10:30:45Z-
dc.date.available2013-12-02T10:30:45Z-
dc.date.issued2013-10-13-
dc.identifier.citationMethods of recording theatre activity across publicly funded hospitals in Ireland. 2013: Ir J Med Scien_GB
dc.identifier.issn1863-4362-
dc.identifier.pmid24122130-
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s11845-013-1030-y-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/306082-
dc.descriptionBACKGROUND: A review of theatre activity in all Health Service Executive (HSE) hospitals in Cork and Kerry in 2008 required a manual extraction of theatre activity data from largely paper-based logbooks. A key data management recommendation suggested that "a standardised computerised theatre logbook system be developed in all hospitals in the region". HSE (2010) Reconfiguration of health services for Cork and Kerry-theatre utilisation review. ISBN 978-1-906218-54-6. MATERIALS AND METHODS: In 2010, a computerised minimum dataset project group conducted a telephone survey of theatre managers nationally to determine the methods of recording theatre activity across publicly funded hospital theatres in Ireland. RESULTS: Sixty-one percent of acute hospitals nationally did not have a computerised theatre register. Of those who did, 15 % had a fully electronic system, 13 % had a dual paper-based and electronic system and 7 % had a single surgical specialty system. The HSE South region was significantly deprived of an electronic operating system in comparison to other HSE regions. While the total number of fully computerised hospital theatres remained small, they still dealt with the greater number of hospital discharges nationally. CONCLUSIONS: The roll-out of the productive operating theatre programme is facilitating the implementation of operating room management systems on a phased basis nationally. This will greatly facilitate audit, research, patient care and theatre efficiencies.en_GB
dc.description.abstractA review of theatre activity in all Health Service Executive (HSE) hospitals in Cork and Kerry in 2008 required a manual extraction of theatre activity data from largely paper-based logbooks. A key data management recommendation suggested that "a standardised computerised theatre logbook system be developed in all hospitals in the region". HSE (2010) Reconfiguration of health services for Cork and Kerry-theatre utilisation review. ISBN 978-1-906218-54-6.-
dc.description.abstractIn 2010, a computerised minimum dataset project group conducted a telephone survey of theatre managers nationally to determine the methods of recording theatre activity across publicly funded hospital theatres in Ireland.-
dc.description.abstractSixty-one percent of acute hospitals nationally did not have a computerised theatre register. Of those who did, 15 % had a fully electronic system, 13 % had a dual paper-based and electronic system and 7 % had a single surgical specialty system. The HSE South region was significantly deprived of an electronic operating system in comparison to other HSE regions. While the total number of fully computerised hospital theatres remained small, they still dealt with the greater number of hospital discharges nationally.-
dc.description.abstractThe roll-out of the productive operating theatre programme is facilitating the implementation of operating room management systems on a phased basis nationally. This will greatly facilitate audit, research, patient care and theatre efficiencies.-
dc.languageENG-
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Irish journal of medical scienceen_GB
dc.subject.otherPUBLIC HEALTH DEPARTMENTen_GB
dc.subject.otherHEALTH SERVICE PLANNINGen_GB
dc.subject.otherOPERATING THEATREen_GB
dc.subject.otherCOMPUTERISATIONen_GB
dc.subject.otherTHEATRE ACTIVITYen_GB
dc.subject.otherINFORMATION TECHNOLOGYen_GB
dc.subject.otherPRODUCTIVE OPERATING THEATREen_GB
dc.titleMethods of recording theatre activity across publicly funded hospitals in Ireland.en_GB
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Public Health, Health Service Executive, Cork, Ireland, judy.cronin@hse.ie.en_GB
dc.identifier.journalIrish journal of medical scienceen_GB

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