Influenza in hospitalized children in Ireland in the pandemic period and the 2010/2011 season: risk factors for paediatric intensive-care-unit admission.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/305997
Title:
Influenza in hospitalized children in Ireland in the pandemic period and the 2010/2011 season: risk factors for paediatric intensive-care-unit admission.
Authors:
Rebolledo, J; Igoe, D; O'Donnell, J; Domegan, L; Boland, M; Freyne, B; McNamara, A; Molloy, E; Callaghan, M; Ryan, A; O'Flanagan, D
Affiliation:
Health Protection Surveillance Centre, Health Service Executive, Dublin, Ireland.
Citation:
Influenza in hospitalized children in Ireland in the pandemic period and the 2010/2011 season: risk factors for paediatric intensive-care-unit admission. 2013:1-10 Epidemiol. Infect.
Journal:
Epidemiology and infection
Issue Date:
11-Nov-2013
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/305997
DOI:
10.1017/S0950268813002732
PubMed ID:
24229618
Abstract:
SUMMARY Influenza causes significant morbidity and mortality in children. This study's objectives were to describe influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 during the pandemic, to compare it with circulating influenza in 2010/2011, and to identify risk factors for severe influenza defined as requiring admission to a paediatric intensive care unit (PICU). Children hospitalized with influenza during the pandemic were older, and more likely to have received antiviral therapy than children hospitalized during the 2010/2011 season. In 2010/2011, only one child admitted to a PICU with underlying medical conditions had been vaccinated. The risk of severe illness in the pandemic was higher in females and those with underlying conditions. In 2010/2011, infection with influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 compared to other influenza viruses was a significant risk factor for severe disease. An incremental relationship was found between the number of underlying conditions and PICU admission. These findings highlight the importance of improving low vaccination uptake and increasing the use of antivirals in vulnerable children.
Item Type:
Article
Language:
en
Keywords:
INFLUENZA; EMERGENCY MEDICINE; INFECTION CONTROL; CHILD HEALTH
Local subject classification:
PANDEMIC
ISSN:
1469-4409

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorRebolledo, Jen_GB
dc.contributor.authorIgoe, Den_GB
dc.contributor.authorO'Donnell, Jen_GB
dc.contributor.authorDomegan, Len_GB
dc.contributor.authorBoland, Men_GB
dc.contributor.authorFreyne, Ben_GB
dc.contributor.authorMcNamara, Aen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMolloy, Een_GB
dc.contributor.authorCallaghan, Men_GB
dc.contributor.authorRyan, Aen_GB
dc.contributor.authorO'Flanagan, Den_GB
dc.date.accessioned2013-11-29T17:04:33Z-
dc.date.available2013-11-29T17:04:33Z-
dc.date.issued2013-11-11-
dc.identifier.citationInfluenza in hospitalized children in Ireland in the pandemic period and the 2010/2011 season: risk factors for paediatric intensive-care-unit admission. 2013:1-10 Epidemiol. Infect.en_GB
dc.identifier.issn1469-4409-
dc.identifier.pmid24229618-
dc.identifier.doi10.1017/S0950268813002732-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/305997-
dc.description.abstractSUMMARY Influenza causes significant morbidity and mortality in children. This study's objectives were to describe influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 during the pandemic, to compare it with circulating influenza in 2010/2011, and to identify risk factors for severe influenza defined as requiring admission to a paediatric intensive care unit (PICU). Children hospitalized with influenza during the pandemic were older, and more likely to have received antiviral therapy than children hospitalized during the 2010/2011 season. In 2010/2011, only one child admitted to a PICU with underlying medical conditions had been vaccinated. The risk of severe illness in the pandemic was higher in females and those with underlying conditions. In 2010/2011, infection with influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 compared to other influenza viruses was a significant risk factor for severe disease. An incremental relationship was found between the number of underlying conditions and PICU admission. These findings highlight the importance of improving low vaccination uptake and increasing the use of antivirals in vulnerable children.-
dc.languageENG-
dc.language.isoenen
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Epidemiology and infectionen_GB
dc.subjectINFLUENZAen_GB
dc.subjectEMERGENCY MEDICINEen_GB
dc.subjectINFECTION CONTROLen_GB
dc.subjectCHILD HEALTHen_GB
dc.subject.otherPANDEMICen_GB
dc.titleInfluenza in hospitalized children in Ireland in the pandemic period and the 2010/2011 season: risk factors for paediatric intensive-care-unit admission.en_GB
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentHealth Protection Surveillance Centre, Health Service Executive, Dublin, Ireland.en_GB
dc.identifier.journalEpidemiology and infectionen_GB

Related articles on PubMed

All Items in Lenus, The Irish Health Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.