The molecular mechanisms of offspring effects from obese pregnancy.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/305679
Title:
The molecular mechanisms of offspring effects from obese pregnancy.
Authors:
Dowling, Daniel; McAuliffe, Fionnuala M
Affiliation:
UCD Obstetrics & Gynaecology, School of Medicine and Medical Science, University College Dublin, National Maternity Hospital, Dublin, Ireland.
Citation:
The molecular mechanisms of offspring effects from obese pregnancy. 2013, 6 (2):134-45 Obes Facts
Journal:
Obesity facts
Issue Date:
2013
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/305679
DOI:
10.1159/000350706
PubMed ID:
23571656
Abstract:
The incidence of obesity, increased weight gain and the popularity of high-fat / high-sugar diets are seriously impacting upon the global population. Billions of individuals are affected, and although diet and lifestyle are of paramount importance to the development of adult obesity, compelling evidence is emerging which suggests that maternal obesity and related disorders may be passed on to the next generation by non-genetic means. The processes acting within the uteri of obese mothers may permanently predispose offspring to a diverse plethora of diseases ranging from obesity and diabetes to psychiatric disorders. This review aims to summarise some of the molecular mechanisms and active processes currently known about maternal obesity and its effect on foetal and neonatal physiology and metabolism. Complex and multifactorial networks of molecules are intertwined and culminate in a pathologically synergistic manner to cause disruption and disorganisation of foetal physiology. This altered phenotype may potentiate the cycle of intergenerational transmission of obesity and related disorders.
Item Type:
Article
Language:
en
Keywords:
OBESITY; PREGNANCY
MeSH:
Adult; Epigenesis, Genetic; Female; Fetus; Humans; Maternal Nutritional Physiological Phenomena; Obesity; Phenotype; Pregnancy; Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects
ISSN:
1662-4033

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorDowling, Danielen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMcAuliffe, Fionnuala Men_GB
dc.date.accessioned2013-11-22T12:54:24Z-
dc.date.available2013-11-22T12:54:24Z-
dc.date.issued2013-
dc.identifier.citationThe molecular mechanisms of offspring effects from obese pregnancy. 2013, 6 (2):134-45 Obes Factsen_GB
dc.identifier.issn1662-4033-
dc.identifier.pmid23571656-
dc.identifier.doi10.1159/000350706-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/305679-
dc.description.abstractThe incidence of obesity, increased weight gain and the popularity of high-fat / high-sugar diets are seriously impacting upon the global population. Billions of individuals are affected, and although diet and lifestyle are of paramount importance to the development of adult obesity, compelling evidence is emerging which suggests that maternal obesity and related disorders may be passed on to the next generation by non-genetic means. The processes acting within the uteri of obese mothers may permanently predispose offspring to a diverse plethora of diseases ranging from obesity and diabetes to psychiatric disorders. This review aims to summarise some of the molecular mechanisms and active processes currently known about maternal obesity and its effect on foetal and neonatal physiology and metabolism. Complex and multifactorial networks of molecules are intertwined and culminate in a pathologically synergistic manner to cause disruption and disorganisation of foetal physiology. This altered phenotype may potentiate the cycle of intergenerational transmission of obesity and related disorders.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Obesity factsen_GB
dc.subjectOBESITYen_GB
dc.subjectPREGNANCYen_GB
dc.subject.meshAdult-
dc.subject.meshEpigenesis, Genetic-
dc.subject.meshFemale-
dc.subject.meshFetus-
dc.subject.meshHumans-
dc.subject.meshMaternal Nutritional Physiological Phenomena-
dc.subject.meshObesity-
dc.subject.meshPhenotype-
dc.subject.meshPregnancy-
dc.subject.meshPrenatal Exposure Delayed Effects-
dc.titleThe molecular mechanisms of offspring effects from obese pregnancy.en_GB
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUCD Obstetrics & Gynaecology, School of Medicine and Medical Science, University College Dublin, National Maternity Hospital, Dublin, Ireland.en_GB
dc.identifier.journalObesity factsen_GB
dc.description.fundingNo fundingen
dc.description.provinceLeinsteren
dc.description.peer-reviewpeer-reviewen

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