Contraceptive needs: the evidence, a literature review

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/305223
Title:
Contraceptive needs: the evidence, a literature review
Authors:
Mason, Caroline
Publisher:
Crisis Pregancy Agency
Issue Date:
Jul-2004
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/305223
Item Type:
Report
Language:
en
Description:
The research in Ireland shows that people are becoming sexually active at a younger age, with estimates of about 70% using contraception at first intercourse. The main methods of contraception in Ireland are the pill and condoms, with only small numbers using other methods. The use of natural methods has declined to very low levels. This pattern is similar to the United Kingdom (UK). In Ireland provision of sterilisation is patchy, with long waiting lists in many areas. Sterilisation rates vary in different countries and are affected by cultural issues and service availability. In Ireland the pill is more popular with younger women than with older women. Estimates for use of emergency contraception (EC) vary but usage seems to be higher among younger women. Women need to know about EC and recognise the need for it in order to use it. Service providers need to be familiar with the indications and contraindications for EC, and make women aware that it is available. Out-of-hours access to this method can be difficult. Apart from differences with age, in Ireland contraceptive method choice varies with marital status, educational attainment, social class and entitlement to a general medical services card (GMS card also known as ‘medical card’). Access to (including ability to pay for) services can also affect choice of contraception and this is important for people in rural areas, people on low income and young people.
Keywords:
CONTRACEPTION; SEXUAL BEHAVIOUR
Series/Report no.:
Crisis Pregnancy Agency report; No. 5

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorMason, Carolineen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2013-11-11T17:13:58Z-
dc.date.available2013-11-11T17:13:58Z-
dc.date.issued2004-07-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/305223-
dc.descriptionThe research in Ireland shows that people are becoming sexually active at a younger age, with estimates of about 70% using contraception at first intercourse. The main methods of contraception in Ireland are the pill and condoms, with only small numbers using other methods. The use of natural methods has declined to very low levels. This pattern is similar to the United Kingdom (UK). In Ireland provision of sterilisation is patchy, with long waiting lists in many areas. Sterilisation rates vary in different countries and are affected by cultural issues and service availability. In Ireland the pill is more popular with younger women than with older women. Estimates for use of emergency contraception (EC) vary but usage seems to be higher among younger women. Women need to know about EC and recognise the need for it in order to use it. Service providers need to be familiar with the indications and contraindications for EC, and make women aware that it is available. Out-of-hours access to this method can be difficult. Apart from differences with age, in Ireland contraceptive method choice varies with marital status, educational attainment, social class and entitlement to a general medical services card (GMS card also known as ‘medical card’). Access to (including ability to pay for) services can also affect choice of contraception and this is important for people in rural areas, people on low income and young people.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherCrisis Pregancy Agencyen_GB
dc.relation.ispartofseriesCrisis Pregnancy Agency reporten_GB
dc.relation.ispartofseriesNo. 5en_GB
dc.subjectCONTRACEPTIONen_GB
dc.subjectSEXUAL BEHAVIOURen_GB
dc.titleContraceptive needs: the evidence, a literature reviewen_GB
dc.typeReporten
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