A review of the international literature on the role of outside facilitators in the delivery of school-based sex education

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/305216
Title:
A review of the international literature on the role of outside facilitators in the delivery of school-based sex education
Authors:
de Vries, Jan; Mayock, Paula; Higgins, Agnes; Sherlock, Leslie; Doyle, Louise; Andrews, Lorraine; Sheaf, Greg
Affiliation:
Crisis Pregnancy Agency
Publisher:
Crisis Pregnancy Agency
Issue Date:
Dec-2009
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/305216
Item Type:
Report
Language:
en
Description:
Schools are one of the main sites where knowledge can be imparted on sexuality and relationships. There is widespread parental support in the Irish context for the provision of school-based sex education (Morgan, 2000; North Western Health Board, 2004; Mayock, Kitching and Morgan, 2007), and recent research also suggests that young people strongly favour classes that deal with relationships, sexuality and sexual health (Hyde and Howlett, 2004; Mayock and Byrne, 2004). However, school-based sex education is a challenging area of curricular provision and one with which many schools continue to struggle. Different approaches to provision and delivery exist: for example, relationships and sexuality education can be delivered by teachers, peers and/or outside agencies, health professionals, and some models incorporate all three modes of delivery (Young, 2004). The practice of involving outside agencies/professionals in the delivery of school-based RSE is a relatively common practice in Ireland (Mayock et al., 2007), yet there are gaps in knowledge and understanding of the potential role these professionals play in supporting schools and teachers in the delivery of sex education. This introductory section provides a background and context for an international literature review of external supports for school-based sex education, with specific reference to Relationships and Sexuality Education (RSE) in Ireland. The section begins by briefly outlining the main features of RSE policy and comments on the place of outside facilitators within this policy (Section 1.1). Attention is then drawn to dimensions of RSE policy (and existing policy guidelines) that have potential implications for schools’ use of outside facilitators (Section 1.2). Section 1.3 reviews the current state of knowledge about outside facilitators to RSE in the Irish context. The final section outlines the scope and method of this international review of literature on external supports for school-based sex education.
Keywords:
SEXUALITY; SEXUAL HEALTH PROMOTION; SCHOOL
Series/Report no.:
Crisis Pregnancy Agency report; No. 22
ISSN:
9781905199020

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorde Vries, Janen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMayock, Paulaen_GB
dc.contributor.authorHiggins, Agnesen_GB
dc.contributor.authorSherlock, Leslieen_GB
dc.contributor.authorDoyle, Louiseen_GB
dc.contributor.authorAndrews, Lorraineen_GB
dc.contributor.authorSheaf, Gregen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2013-11-11T17:27:36Z-
dc.date.available2013-11-11T17:27:36Z-
dc.date.issued2009-12-
dc.identifier.issn9781905199020-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/305216-
dc.descriptionSchools are one of the main sites where knowledge can be imparted on sexuality and relationships. There is widespread parental support in the Irish context for the provision of school-based sex education (Morgan, 2000; North Western Health Board, 2004; Mayock, Kitching and Morgan, 2007), and recent research also suggests that young people strongly favour classes that deal with relationships, sexuality and sexual health (Hyde and Howlett, 2004; Mayock and Byrne, 2004). However, school-based sex education is a challenging area of curricular provision and one with which many schools continue to struggle. Different approaches to provision and delivery exist: for example, relationships and sexuality education can be delivered by teachers, peers and/or outside agencies, health professionals, and some models incorporate all three modes of delivery (Young, 2004). The practice of involving outside agencies/professionals in the delivery of school-based RSE is a relatively common practice in Ireland (Mayock et al., 2007), yet there are gaps in knowledge and understanding of the potential role these professionals play in supporting schools and teachers in the delivery of sex education. This introductory section provides a background and context for an international literature review of external supports for school-based sex education, with specific reference to Relationships and Sexuality Education (RSE) in Ireland. The section begins by briefly outlining the main features of RSE policy and comments on the place of outside facilitators within this policy (Section 1.1). Attention is then drawn to dimensions of RSE policy (and existing policy guidelines) that have potential implications for schools’ use of outside facilitators (Section 1.2). Section 1.3 reviews the current state of knowledge about outside facilitators to RSE in the Irish context. The final section outlines the scope and method of this international review of literature on external supports for school-based sex education.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherCrisis Pregnancy Agencyen_GB
dc.relation.ispartofseriesCrisis Pregnancy Agency reporten_GB
dc.relation.ispartofseriesNo. 22en_GB
dc.subjectSEXUALITYen_GB
dc.subjectSEXUAL HEALTH PROMOTIONen_GB
dc.subjectSCHOOLen_GB
dc.titleA review of the international literature on the role of outside facilitators in the delivery of school-based sex educationen_GB
dc.typeReporten
dc.contributor.departmentCrisis Pregnancy Agencyen_GB
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