Neonatal hearing screening of high-risk infants using automated auditory brainstem response: a retrospective analysis of referral rates.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/304583
Title:
Neonatal hearing screening of high-risk infants using automated auditory brainstem response: a retrospective analysis of referral rates.
Authors:
McGurgan, I J; Patil, N
Affiliation:
School of Medicine, Trinity College Dublin, College Green, Dublin 2, Ireland, mcgurgai@tcd.ie.
Citation:
Neonatal hearing screening of high-risk infants using automated auditory brainstem response: a retrospective analysis of referral rates. 2013: Ir J Med Sci
Publisher:
Irish journal of medical science
Journal:
Irish Journal of Medical Science
Issue Date:
7-Oct-2013
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/304583
DOI:
10.1007/s11845-013-1028-5
PubMed ID:
24097063
Abstract:
The past decade has seen the widespread introduction of universal neonatal hearing screening (UNHS) programmes worldwide. Regrettably, such a programme is only now in the process of nationwide implementation in the Republic of Ireland and has been largely restricted to one screening modality for initial testing; namely transient evoked otoacoustic emissions (TEOAE). The aim of this study is to analyse the effects of employing a different screening protocol which utilises an alternative initial test, automated auditory brainstem response (AABR), on referral rates to specialist audiology services.; A retrospective analysis was performed of all neonatal hearing screening in Letterkenny General Hospital over 5 years, from January 2008 to December 2012, which was confined to infants possessing one or more known risk factors for permanent childhood hearing impairment. 1,163 infants were screened using AABR during this period and subsequent re-test and referral rates to specialist audiology services were examined.; Of the infants screened, 50 (4.3 %) failed the initial AABR. A further 16 of these (32 %) failed the repeat AABR, resulting in an overall referral rate to specialist audiology services of 1.38 %.; Our results demonstrate strikingly low overall referral rates in this cohort, falling well below both the international benchmark and the initial results of the Irish UNHS programme. This provides a convincing argument for examining AABR as a potential alternative to TEOAE in the nationwide UNHS.
Item Type:
Article
Language:
en
Description:
OBJECTIVE: The past decade has seen the widespread introduction of universal neonatal hearing screening (UNHS) programmes worldwide. Regrettably, such a programme is only now in the process of nationwide implementation in the Republic of Ireland and has been largely restricted to one screening modality for initial testing; namely transient evoked otoacoustic emissions (TEOAE). The aim of this study is to analyse the effects of employing a different screening protocol which utilises an alternative initial test, automated auditory brainstem response (AABR), on referral rates to specialist audiology services. METHODS: A retrospective analysis was performed of all neonatal hearing screening in Letterkenny General Hospital over 5 years, from January 2008 to December 2012, which was confined to infants possessing one or more known risk factors for permanent childhood hearing impairment. 1,163 infants were screened using AABR during this period and subsequent re-test and referral rates to specialist audiology services were examined. RESULTS: Of the infants screened, 50 (4.3 %) failed the initial AABR. A further 16 of these (32 %) failed the repeat AABR, resulting in an overall referral rate to specialist audiology services of 1.38 %. CONCLUSION: Our results demonstrate strikingly low overall referral rates in this cohort, falling well below both the international benchmark and the initial results of the Irish UNHS programme. This provides a convincing argument for examining AABR as a potential alternative to TEOAE in the nationwide UNHS.
Keywords:
AUDIOLOGY; NEONATE; HEALTH SCREENING
ISSN:
1863-4362

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorMcGurgan, I Jen_GB
dc.contributor.authorPatil, Nen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2013-10-23T11:16:22Z-
dc.date.available2013-10-23T11:16:22Z-
dc.date.issued2013-10-07-
dc.identifier.citationNeonatal hearing screening of high-risk infants using automated auditory brainstem response: a retrospective analysis of referral rates. 2013: Ir J Med Scien_GB
dc.identifier.issn1863-4362-
dc.identifier.pmid24097063-
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s11845-013-1028-5-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/304583-
dc.descriptionOBJECTIVE: The past decade has seen the widespread introduction of universal neonatal hearing screening (UNHS) programmes worldwide. Regrettably, such a programme is only now in the process of nationwide implementation in the Republic of Ireland and has been largely restricted to one screening modality for initial testing; namely transient evoked otoacoustic emissions (TEOAE). The aim of this study is to analyse the effects of employing a different screening protocol which utilises an alternative initial test, automated auditory brainstem response (AABR), on referral rates to specialist audiology services. METHODS: A retrospective analysis was performed of all neonatal hearing screening in Letterkenny General Hospital over 5 years, from January 2008 to December 2012, which was confined to infants possessing one or more known risk factors for permanent childhood hearing impairment. 1,163 infants were screened using AABR during this period and subsequent re-test and referral rates to specialist audiology services were examined. RESULTS: Of the infants screened, 50 (4.3 %) failed the initial AABR. A further 16 of these (32 %) failed the repeat AABR, resulting in an overall referral rate to specialist audiology services of 1.38 %. CONCLUSION: Our results demonstrate strikingly low overall referral rates in this cohort, falling well below both the international benchmark and the initial results of the Irish UNHS programme. This provides a convincing argument for examining AABR as a potential alternative to TEOAE in the nationwide UNHS.en_GB
dc.description.abstractThe past decade has seen the widespread introduction of universal neonatal hearing screening (UNHS) programmes worldwide. Regrettably, such a programme is only now in the process of nationwide implementation in the Republic of Ireland and has been largely restricted to one screening modality for initial testing; namely transient evoked otoacoustic emissions (TEOAE). The aim of this study is to analyse the effects of employing a different screening protocol which utilises an alternative initial test, automated auditory brainstem response (AABR), on referral rates to specialist audiology services.-
dc.description.abstractA retrospective analysis was performed of all neonatal hearing screening in Letterkenny General Hospital over 5 years, from January 2008 to December 2012, which was confined to infants possessing one or more known risk factors for permanent childhood hearing impairment. 1,163 infants were screened using AABR during this period and subsequent re-test and referral rates to specialist audiology services were examined.-
dc.description.abstractOf the infants screened, 50 (4.3 %) failed the initial AABR. A further 16 of these (32 %) failed the repeat AABR, resulting in an overall referral rate to specialist audiology services of 1.38 %.-
dc.description.abstractOur results demonstrate strikingly low overall referral rates in this cohort, falling well below both the international benchmark and the initial results of the Irish UNHS programme. This provides a convincing argument for examining AABR as a potential alternative to TEOAE in the nationwide UNHS.-
dc.languageENG-
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherIrish journal of medical scienceen_GB
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Irish journal of medical scienceen_GB
dc.subjectAUDIOLOGYen_GB
dc.subjectNEONATEen_GB
dc.subjectHEALTH SCREENINGen_GB
dc.titleNeonatal hearing screening of high-risk infants using automated auditory brainstem response: a retrospective analysis of referral rates.en_GB
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentSchool of Medicine, Trinity College Dublin, College Green, Dublin 2, Ireland, mcgurgai@tcd.ie.en_GB
dc.identifier.journalIrish Journal of Medical Scienceen_GB
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