Case report: management of broken dental needles in practice

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/304582
Title:
Case report: management of broken dental needles in practice
Authors:
Rahman, Naomi; Clarke, Mary; Stassen, Leo FA
Publisher:
Irish Dental Assocation (IDA)
Issue Date:
Oct-2013
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/304582
Abstract:
It is estimated that 60,000 cartridges of local anaesthetic are used weekly in the USA for dental anaesthesia by infiltration or block injections.1 The complication of needle breakage after an inferior alveolar nerve block is relatively rare in dental practice.2 One of the first ever case series on dental needle breakage was published in 1928 by Blum, who reported 65 broken needles over a tenyear period.3 The routine use of single-use, disposable stainless steel needles made from stronger alloys has decreased this complication.4 Today, needle breakage during local anaesthesia may be attributed to a faulty needle, an incorrect anaesthetic injection technique or sudden movement by the patient in a direction opposite to the needle.5 It is important to caution the patient against sudden movement during administration of the injection. The needle should not be redirected against tissue resistance while it is embedded in tissue, as this can cause breakage to occur.6
Item Type:
Article
Language:
en
Keywords:
DENTAL HEALTH

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorRahman, Naomien_GB
dc.contributor.authorClarke, Maryen_GB
dc.contributor.authorStassen, Leo FAen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2013-10-23T11:14:22Z-
dc.date.available2013-10-23T11:14:22Z-
dc.date.issued2013-10-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/304582-
dc.description.abstractIt is estimated that 60,000 cartridges of local anaesthetic are used weekly in the USA for dental anaesthesia by infiltration or block injections.1 The complication of needle breakage after an inferior alveolar nerve block is relatively rare in dental practice.2 One of the first ever case series on dental needle breakage was published in 1928 by Blum, who reported 65 broken needles over a tenyear period.3 The routine use of single-use, disposable stainless steel needles made from stronger alloys has decreased this complication.4 Today, needle breakage during local anaesthesia may be attributed to a faulty needle, an incorrect anaesthetic injection technique or sudden movement by the patient in a direction opposite to the needle.5 It is important to caution the patient against sudden movement during administration of the injection. The needle should not be redirected against tissue resistance while it is embedded in tissue, as this can cause breakage to occur.6en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherIrish Dental Assocation (IDA)en_GB
dc.subjectDENTAL HEALTHen_GB
dc.titleCase report: management of broken dental needles in practiceen_GB
dc.typeArticleen
dc.description.fundingNo fundingen
dc.description.provinceLeinsteren
dc.description.peer-reviewpeer-reviewen
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