The impact of changes in work practice and service delivery on surgical infection rates in a general surgical unit

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/303576
Title:
The impact of changes in work practice and service delivery on surgical infection rates in a general surgical unit
Authors:
Piggott, R; Hogan, A; Concannon, E; Sharkey, M; Waldron, R; Khan, W; Barry, K
Publisher:
Irish Medical Journal (IMJ)
Journal:
Irish Medical Journal (IMJ)
Issue Date:
Oct-2013
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/303576
Abstract:
Ring-fencing of elective orthopaedic beds has been shown to significantly reduce surgical site infection (SSI) rates. There are fewer studies in general surgical practice. Comparison of overall surgical workload in 2007 and 2011 was performed. Data pertaining to SSI were collected and analysis of this prospectively maintained database was performed on all SSI diagnosed in 2007 and 2011. There was a significant reduction in the crude SSI rate from 117 cases in 2007 (8%) to 42 cases in 2011 (3.5%). A statistically significant reduction in SSI rate for elective surgery was observed, 7.6% vs. 2.5% (p<0.001 Chi-square test). Apart from the introduction of ring fencing, all other contributory variables remained unchanged. Ring-fencing of inpatient general surgical beds has been associated with a significant reduction in SSI rates. These data provide timely supportive evidence that ring-fencing of inpatient beds is an appropriate patient-orientated strategy.
Item Type:
Article
Language:
en
Keywords:
SURGERY; HEALTH SERVICES AND THEIR MANAGEMENT; INFECTION CONTROL
Local subject classification:
ORTHOPAEDICS

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorPiggott, Ren_GB
dc.contributor.authorHogan, Aen_GB
dc.contributor.authorConcannon, Een_GB
dc.contributor.authorSharkey, Men_GB
dc.contributor.authorWaldron, Ren_GB
dc.contributor.authorKhan, Wen_GB
dc.contributor.authorBarry, Ken_GB
dc.date.accessioned2013-10-17T16:40:53Z-
dc.date.available2013-10-17T16:40:53Z-
dc.date.issued2013-10-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/303576-
dc.description.abstractRing-fencing of elective orthopaedic beds has been shown to significantly reduce surgical site infection (SSI) rates. There are fewer studies in general surgical practice. Comparison of overall surgical workload in 2007 and 2011 was performed. Data pertaining to SSI were collected and analysis of this prospectively maintained database was performed on all SSI diagnosed in 2007 and 2011. There was a significant reduction in the crude SSI rate from 117 cases in 2007 (8%) to 42 cases in 2011 (3.5%). A statistically significant reduction in SSI rate for elective surgery was observed, 7.6% vs. 2.5% (p<0.001 Chi-square test). Apart from the introduction of ring fencing, all other contributory variables remained unchanged. Ring-fencing of inpatient general surgical beds has been associated with a significant reduction in SSI rates. These data provide timely supportive evidence that ring-fencing of inpatient beds is an appropriate patient-orientated strategy.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherIrish Medical Journal (IMJ)en_GB
dc.subjectSURGERYen_GB
dc.subjectHEALTH SERVICES AND THEIR MANAGEMENTen_GB
dc.subjectINFECTION CONTROLen_GB
dc.subject.otherORTHOPAEDICSen_GB
dc.titleThe impact of changes in work practice and service delivery on surgical infection rates in a general surgical uniten_GB
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalIrish Medical Journal (IMJ)en_GB
dc.description.fundingNo fundingen
dc.description.provinceConnachten
dc.description.peer-reviewpeer-reviewen
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