Surveillance, diagnosis and management of Clostridium Difficile Infection in Ireland update of 2008 guidance

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/303406
Title:
Surveillance, diagnosis and management of Clostridium Difficile Infection in Ireland update of 2008 guidance
Authors:
Clostridium difficile Sub ‐ Committee
Affiliation:
Health Service Executive (HSE)
Publisher:
Health Protection Surveillance Centre (HPSC)
Issue Date:
Jun-2013
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/303406
Item Type:
Guideline
Language:
en
Description:
Summary Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) results in a wide spectrum of illness ranging from mild diarrhoea to severe colitis. CDI is associated with receiving healthcare and antibiotic use. CDI principally affects hospitalised patients, though recently has become an important cause of diarrhoea in long term care facilities and in the community. Patients/residents with CDI experience considerable morbidity and are more likely to require additional healthcare interventions (e.g., isolation, additional therapies and procedures). CDI is a potentially avoidable healthcare cost. The first national guidelines for the prevention and control of C. difficile –associated disease were published in Ireland by the HSE ‐ Health Protection Surveillance Centre (HPSC) in May 2008 and launched by the Minister for Health, Ms. Mary Harney. Since then, infection with C. difficile is a notifiable infectious disease and we have gathered information on the epidemiology of CDI in Ireland, (Section A.4) advancing our understanding of CDI. There has also been significant developments in the diagnosis, prevention and treatment of CDI since publication of the 2008 guidelines. The purpose of these guidelines is to therefore update the 2008 guidelines where relevant as outlined in Sections A.1 & A.5 ‐ 6. These guidelines apply to all healthcare staff, irrespective of the healthcare setting, and their implementation will prevent and control CDI in patients/residents in all healthcare settings in Ireland. The updated guidelines are divided into four sections: • Section A: Background (which includes an overview of CDI epidemiology in Ireland, summary of the financial and clinical impact of CDI, aims & scope and methodology for guideline review & an overview of potential barriers to implementation) • Section B: Recommendations • Section C: Rationale for recommendations • Section D: Appendices and references. The recommendations Section B has been redesigned to consist of seven parts in a question and answer format with Section C providing the rationale for each recommendation
Keywords:
INFECTION CONTROL
Local subject classification:
CLOSTRIDIUM DIFFICILE INFECTION

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorClostridium difficile Sub ‐ Committeeen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2013-10-14T13:15:35Z-
dc.date.available2013-10-14T13:15:35Z-
dc.date.issued2013-06-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/303406-
dc.descriptionSummary Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) results in a wide spectrum of illness ranging from mild diarrhoea to severe colitis. CDI is associated with receiving healthcare and antibiotic use. CDI principally affects hospitalised patients, though recently has become an important cause of diarrhoea in long term care facilities and in the community. Patients/residents with CDI experience considerable morbidity and are more likely to require additional healthcare interventions (e.g., isolation, additional therapies and procedures). CDI is a potentially avoidable healthcare cost. The first national guidelines for the prevention and control of C. difficile –associated disease were published in Ireland by the HSE ‐ Health Protection Surveillance Centre (HPSC) in May 2008 and launched by the Minister for Health, Ms. Mary Harney. Since then, infection with C. difficile is a notifiable infectious disease and we have gathered information on the epidemiology of CDI in Ireland, (Section A.4) advancing our understanding of CDI. There has also been significant developments in the diagnosis, prevention and treatment of CDI since publication of the 2008 guidelines. The purpose of these guidelines is to therefore update the 2008 guidelines where relevant as outlined in Sections A.1 & A.5 ‐ 6. These guidelines apply to all healthcare staff, irrespective of the healthcare setting, and their implementation will prevent and control CDI in patients/residents in all healthcare settings in Ireland. The updated guidelines are divided into four sections: • Section A: Background (which includes an overview of CDI epidemiology in Ireland, summary of the financial and clinical impact of CDI, aims & scope and methodology for guideline review & an overview of potential barriers to implementation) • Section B: Recommendations • Section C: Rationale for recommendations • Section D: Appendices and references. The recommendations Section B has been redesigned to consist of seven parts in a question and answer format with Section C providing the rationale for each recommendationen_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherHealth Protection Surveillance Centre (HPSC)en_GB
dc.subjectINFECTION CONTROLen_GB
dc.subject.otherCLOSTRIDIUM DIFFICILE INFECTIONen_GB
dc.titleSurveillance, diagnosis and management of Clostridium Difficile Infection in Ireland update of 2008 guidanceen_GB
dc.typeGuidelineen
dc.contributor.departmentHealth Service Executive (HSE)en_GB
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