National Hepatitis C database for infection acquired through blood and blood products: follow up report 2009

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/303385
Title:
National Hepatitis C database for infection acquired through blood and blood products: follow up report 2009
Authors:
Health Protection Surveillance Centre (HPSC)
Publisher:
Health Protection Surveillance Centre (HPSC), Health Service Executive (HSE)
Issue Date:
2009
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/303385
Item Type:
Report
Language:
en
Description:
Hepatitis C infection is a major cause of illness and death, with an estimated 170 million people chronically infected worldwide. Although hepatitis C is not a new disease, the hepatitis C virus was first identified in 1989 so many aspects of its natural history remain to be clarified. Between 50 and 85% of people infected develop chronic infection. A significant proportion develop progressive fibrosis which can lead to liver failure, cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma, usually several decades after infection. However, with the advent of new drug therapies, the disease can now be treated successfully in many people. Approximately 1,700 people were infected with hepatitis C through receipt of contaminated blood and blood products in Ireland. These include women infected through anti-D immunoglobulin, recipients of blood transfusion, people with haemophilia and other blood clotting disorders and people who received treatment for renal disease. On the recommendation of the Consultative Council on Hepatitis C, a database was set up to gather important information on an ongoing basis on this group of people. The fact that most of these people have a known date of infection and are being regularly followed up through a small number of specialist services provides a unique opportunity to carry out research into the natural history of hepatitis C and its treatment. Information collected through the database will also facilitate planning and evaluation of health services. Baseline data collection took place in 2005 and 2006 and a report on these data was published in 2007. The first round of follow-up data collection was then carried out in 2007 and this report describes the main findings from these data.
Keywords:
HEPATITIS C; BLOODBORNE TRANSMISSION; INFECTION CONTROL
ISBN:
9780955123627

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorHealth Protection Surveillance Centre (HPSC)en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2013-10-14T10:12:42Z-
dc.date.available2013-10-14T10:12:42Z-
dc.date.issued2009-
dc.identifier.isbn9780955123627-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/303385-
dc.descriptionHepatitis C infection is a major cause of illness and death, with an estimated 170 million people chronically infected worldwide. Although hepatitis C is not a new disease, the hepatitis C virus was first identified in 1989 so many aspects of its natural history remain to be clarified. Between 50 and 85% of people infected develop chronic infection. A significant proportion develop progressive fibrosis which can lead to liver failure, cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma, usually several decades after infection. However, with the advent of new drug therapies, the disease can now be treated successfully in many people. Approximately 1,700 people were infected with hepatitis C through receipt of contaminated blood and blood products in Ireland. These include women infected through anti-D immunoglobulin, recipients of blood transfusion, people with haemophilia and other blood clotting disorders and people who received treatment for renal disease. On the recommendation of the Consultative Council on Hepatitis C, a database was set up to gather important information on an ongoing basis on this group of people. The fact that most of these people have a known date of infection and are being regularly followed up through a small number of specialist services provides a unique opportunity to carry out research into the natural history of hepatitis C and its treatment. Information collected through the database will also facilitate planning and evaluation of health services. Baseline data collection took place in 2005 and 2006 and a report on these data was published in 2007. The first round of follow-up data collection was then carried out in 2007 and this report describes the main findings from these data.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherHealth Protection Surveillance Centre (HPSC), Health Service Executive (HSE)en_GB
dc.subjectHEPATITIS Cen_GB
dc.subjectBLOODBORNE TRANSMISSIONen_GB
dc.subjectINFECTION CONTROLen_GB
dc.titleNational Hepatitis C database for infection acquired through blood and blood products: follow up report 2009en_GB
dc.typeReporten
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