Blood - borne viruses in the haemodialysis , CAPD and renal transplantation setting

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/303305
Title:
Blood - borne viruses in the haemodialysis , CAPD and renal transplantation setting
Authors:
Health Service Executive, Health Protection Surveillance Centre
Publisher:
Health Protection Surveillance Centre
Issue Date:
2013
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/303305
Item Type:
Report
Language:
en
Description:
End stage kidney disease (ESKD) requires a variety of treatment options including HD , CAPD and transplantation, procedures where infection control is of paramount importance. Chronic HD patients are at high risk of infection because the process of HD requires repeated vascular access for prolonged periods. Such patients are susceptible to person - to - person transmission of infectious agents, directly or indirectly, via contaminated devices, equipment and supplies, environmental surfaces or the hands of personnel. For many years, viral hepatitis was recognised as a hazard for HD patients and staff. 1 I n 1972, guidelines were issued in the UK for the prevention and control of hepatitis B virus (HBV) in renal and transplant units. 2 In the US, recommendations for the control of HBV in HD centres were first published in 1977. 3 By 1980, their widespread implementation was associated with a sharp reduction in incidence of HBV infection among both patients and staff members. In 1982, hepatitis B vaccination was recommended for all susceptible patients and staff members. 3 H epatitis C virus ( HCV ) and human im munodeficiency virus ( HIV ) were later identified.
Keywords:
INFECTION CONTROL
Local subject classification:
KIDNEY DISEASE

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorHealth Service Executive, Health Protection Surveillance Centreen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2013-10-11T15:27:21Z-
dc.date.available2013-10-11T15:27:21Z-
dc.date.issued2013-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/303305-
dc.descriptionEnd stage kidney disease (ESKD) requires a variety of treatment options including HD , CAPD and transplantation, procedures where infection control is of paramount importance. Chronic HD patients are at high risk of infection because the process of HD requires repeated vascular access for prolonged periods. Such patients are susceptible to person - to - person transmission of infectious agents, directly or indirectly, via contaminated devices, equipment and supplies, environmental surfaces or the hands of personnel. For many years, viral hepatitis was recognised as a hazard for HD patients and staff. 1 I n 1972, guidelines were issued in the UK for the prevention and control of hepatitis B virus (HBV) in renal and transplant units. 2 In the US, recommendations for the control of HBV in HD centres were first published in 1977. 3 By 1980, their widespread implementation was associated with a sharp reduction in incidence of HBV infection among both patients and staff members. In 1982, hepatitis B vaccination was recommended for all susceptible patients and staff members. 3 H epatitis C virus ( HCV ) and human im munodeficiency virus ( HIV ) were later identified.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherHealth Protection Surveillance Centreen_GB
dc.subjectINFECTION CONTROLen_GB
dc.subject.otherKIDNEY DISEASEen_GB
dc.titleBlood - borne viruses in the haemodialysis , CAPD and renal transplantation settingen_GB
dc.typeReporten
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