Effect of childhood maltreatment on brain structure in adult patients with major depressive disorder and healthy participants.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/303295
Title:
Effect of childhood maltreatment on brain structure in adult patients with major depressive disorder and healthy participants.
Authors:
Chaney, Aisling; Carballedo, Angela; Amico, Francesco; Fagan, Andrew; Skokauskas, Norbert; Meaney, James; Frodl, Thomas
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry, Institute of Neuroscience, Adelaide and Meath Hospital incorporating the National Children's Hospital (AMNCH), Dublin 24, University Dublin, Trinity College, Dublin, Dublin, Ireland.
Citation:
Effect of childhood maltreatment on brain structure in adult patients with major depressive disorder and healthy participants. 2013, 38 (5):120208 J Psychiatry Neurosci
Journal:
Journal of psychiatry & neuroscience : JPN
Issue Date:
30-Jul-2013
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/303295
DOI:
10.1503/jpn.120208
PubMed ID:
23900024
Abstract:
Background: Childhood maltreatment has been found to play a crucial role in the development of psychiatric disorders. However, whether childhood maltreatment is associated with structural brain changes described for major depressive disorder (MDD) is still a matter of debate. The aim of this study was to investigate whether patients with MDD and a history of childhood maltreatment display more structural changes than patients without childhood maltreatment or healthy controls. Methods: Patients with MDD and healthy controls with and without childhood maltreatment experience were investigated using high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and data were analyzed using voxel-based morphometry. Results: We studied 37 patients with MDD and 46 controls. Grey matter volume was significantly decreased in the hippocampus and significantly increased in the dorsomedial prefrontal cortex (DMPFC) and the orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) in participants who had experienced childhood maltreatment compared with those who had not. Patients displayed smaller left OFC and left DMPFC volumes than controls. No significant difference in hippocampal volume was evident between patients with MDD and healthy controls. In regression analyses, despite effects from depression, age and sex on the DMPFC, OFC and hippocampus, childhood maltreatment was found to independently affect these regions. Limitations: The retrospective assessment of childhood maltreatment; the natural problem that patients experienced more childhood maltreatment than controls; and the restrictions, owing to sample size, to investigating higher order interactions among factors are discussed as limitations. Conclusion: These results suggest that early childhood maltreatment is associated with brain structural changes irrespective of sex, age and a history of depression. Thus, the study highlights the importance of childhood maltreatment when investigating brain structures.
Item Type:
Article
Keywords:
CHILD HEALTH; PSYCHIATRIC CARE
Local subject classification:
CHILDHOOD; PSYCHIATRIC DISORDERS
ISSN:
1488-2434

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorChaney, Aislingen_GB
dc.contributor.authorCarballedo, Angelaen_GB
dc.contributor.authorAmico, Francescoen_GB
dc.contributor.authorFagan, Andrewen_GB
dc.contributor.authorSkokauskas, Norberten_GB
dc.contributor.authorMeaney, Jamesen_GB
dc.contributor.authorFrodl, Thomasen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2013-10-11T15:40:03Z-
dc.date.available2013-10-11T15:40:03Z-
dc.date.issued2013-07-30-
dc.identifier.citationEffect of childhood maltreatment on brain structure in adult patients with major depressive disorder and healthy participants. 2013, 38 (5):120208 J Psychiatry Neuroscien_GB
dc.identifier.issn1488-2434-
dc.identifier.pmid23900024-
dc.identifier.doi10.1503/jpn.120208-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/303295-
dc.description.abstractBackground: Childhood maltreatment has been found to play a crucial role in the development of psychiatric disorders. However, whether childhood maltreatment is associated with structural brain changes described for major depressive disorder (MDD) is still a matter of debate. The aim of this study was to investigate whether patients with MDD and a history of childhood maltreatment display more structural changes than patients without childhood maltreatment or healthy controls. Methods: Patients with MDD and healthy controls with and without childhood maltreatment experience were investigated using high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and data were analyzed using voxel-based morphometry. Results: We studied 37 patients with MDD and 46 controls. Grey matter volume was significantly decreased in the hippocampus and significantly increased in the dorsomedial prefrontal cortex (DMPFC) and the orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) in participants who had experienced childhood maltreatment compared with those who had not. Patients displayed smaller left OFC and left DMPFC volumes than controls. No significant difference in hippocampal volume was evident between patients with MDD and healthy controls. In regression analyses, despite effects from depression, age and sex on the DMPFC, OFC and hippocampus, childhood maltreatment was found to independently affect these regions. Limitations: The retrospective assessment of childhood maltreatment; the natural problem that patients experienced more childhood maltreatment than controls; and the restrictions, owing to sample size, to investigating higher order interactions among factors are discussed as limitations. Conclusion: These results suggest that early childhood maltreatment is associated with brain structural changes irrespective of sex, age and a history of depression. Thus, the study highlights the importance of childhood maltreatment when investigating brain structures.en_GB
dc.languageENG-
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Journal of psychiatry & neuroscience : JPNen_GB
dc.subjectCHILD HEALTHen_GB
dc.subjectPSYCHIATRIC CAREen_GB
dc.subject.otherCHILDHOODen_GB
dc.subject.otherPSYCHIATRIC DISORDERSen_GB
dc.titleEffect of childhood maltreatment on brain structure in adult patients with major depressive disorder and healthy participants.en_GB
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Psychiatry, Institute of Neuroscience, Adelaide and Meath Hospital incorporating the National Children's Hospital (AMNCH), Dublin 24, University Dublin, Trinity College, Dublin, Dublin, Ireland.en_GB
dc.identifier.journalJournal of psychiatry & neuroscience : JPNen_GB
dc.description.fundingNo fundingen
dc.description.provinceLeinsteren
dc.description.peer-reviewpeer-reviewen

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