Preventing foodborne disease: A focus on the infected food handler

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/302977
Title:
Preventing foodborne disease: A focus on the infected food handler
Authors:
Subcommittee of the NDSC’s Scientific Advisory Committee
Publisher:
Health Protection Surveillance Centre (HPSC)
Issue Date:
8-Oct-2013
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/302977
Item Type:
Report
Language:
en
Description:
The pathogens found to be most frequently linked to food handler transmission have been Norovirus, Salmonella and Hepatitis A virus (HAV). • To constitute a risk, the infected food handler is generally symptomatic – most often with gastrointestinal symptoms. However, food handlers in the pre- or post-symptomatic phases of illness have also been implicated in causing foodborne outbreaks. • The most frequently associated symptoms are vomiting and/or diarrhoea – underscoring the importance of symptom reporting and exclusion from food handling duties while symptomatic. • By far the most common mode of pathogen transmission to food by the infected food handler is via faecally contaminated hands. Poor hand hygiene is the contributing factor. • Other reported modes of transmission include infected skin lesions (usually on hands), naso-pharyngeal secretions ( Staph, Strep ), aerosolisation of vomitus (Norovirus) and fomites (Norovirus, HAV). • There is overwhelming evidence that food handlers whose work involves touching unwrapped foods to be consumed raw or without further cooking or other forms of treatment (HIGH-RISK FOOD HANDLERS) are those most commonly implicated in foodborne outbreaks. The unhygienic handling of such foods constitutes a particularly grave risk. • Infected food handlers can potentially infect food in any setting, but have been demonstrably implicated at points of the food chain near to the consumer
Keywords:
INFECTION CONTROL; FOOD SAFETY

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorSubcommittee of the NDSC’s Scientific Advisory Committeeen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2013-10-08T15:45:00Z-
dc.date.available2013-10-08T15:45:00Z-
dc.date.issued2013-10-08-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/302977-
dc.descriptionThe pathogens found to be most frequently linked to food handler transmission have been Norovirus, Salmonella and Hepatitis A virus (HAV). • To constitute a risk, the infected food handler is generally symptomatic – most often with gastrointestinal symptoms. However, food handlers in the pre- or post-symptomatic phases of illness have also been implicated in causing foodborne outbreaks. • The most frequently associated symptoms are vomiting and/or diarrhoea – underscoring the importance of symptom reporting and exclusion from food handling duties while symptomatic. • By far the most common mode of pathogen transmission to food by the infected food handler is via faecally contaminated hands. Poor hand hygiene is the contributing factor. • Other reported modes of transmission include infected skin lesions (usually on hands), naso-pharyngeal secretions ( Staph, Strep ), aerosolisation of vomitus (Norovirus) and fomites (Norovirus, HAV). • There is overwhelming evidence that food handlers whose work involves touching unwrapped foods to be consumed raw or without further cooking or other forms of treatment (HIGH-RISK FOOD HANDLERS) are those most commonly implicated in foodborne outbreaks. The unhygienic handling of such foods constitutes a particularly grave risk. • Infected food handlers can potentially infect food in any setting, but have been demonstrably implicated at points of the food chain near to the consumeren_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherHealth Protection Surveillance Centre (HPSC)en_GB
dc.subjectINFECTION CONTROLen_GB
dc.subjectFOOD SAFETYen_GB
dc.titlePreventing foodborne disease: A focus on the infected food handleren_GB
dc.typeReporten
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