Guidelines for control of measles in Ireland

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/302963
Title:
Guidelines for control of measles in Ireland
Authors:
Measles Sub-Committee of the Scientific Advisory Committee NDSC
Publisher:
Health Protection Surveillance Centre (HPSC)
Issue Date:
Oct-2002
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/302963
Item Type:
Report
Language:
en
Description:
Measles is an acute viral illness caused by a viru s in the family paramyxovirus,genus Morbillivirus. Measles is characterized by a prodrome (2-4 days) of fever and malaise, cough, coryza, and conjunctivitis, followed by an erythem atousmaculopapular rash. The rash begins at the hairline, and then involves the face and upper neck. Over the next 3 days, the rash gradually proceeds downwards and outward reaching the hands and feet. Koplik’s spots, an enanthem present on mucous membranes, is considered to be pathognomic for measles. It occurs 1-2 days before the rash to 1-2 days after the rash, and appears as punctate blue-white spots on the bright red background of the buccal mucosa. Though usually a mild or moderately severe Illness of childhood, measles can result in residual impairment from encephalitis in approxima tely 5-10 cases per 10,000 and in death in approximately 1-3 cases per 1000. 1 Complication such as otitis media, bronchopneumonia, laryngotr acheobronchitis (croup), and diarrhoea occur more commonly in young children under the age of 5 years. Pneumonia (6% of reported cases) may be viral or s uperimposed bacterial and is the most common cause of death. Complications such as pneumonia and acute encephalitis are increased in adults over the age of 20 years.
Keywords:
COMMUNICABLE DISEASE
Local subject classification:
MEASLES

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorMeasles Sub-Committee of the Scientific Advisory Committee NDSCen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2013-10-08T08:35:30Z-
dc.date.available2013-10-08T08:35:30Z-
dc.date.issued2002-10-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/302963-
dc.descriptionMeasles is an acute viral illness caused by a viru s in the family paramyxovirus,genus Morbillivirus. Measles is characterized by a prodrome (2-4 days) of fever and malaise, cough, coryza, and conjunctivitis, followed by an erythem atousmaculopapular rash. The rash begins at the hairline, and then involves the face and upper neck. Over the next 3 days, the rash gradually proceeds downwards and outward reaching the hands and feet. Koplik’s spots, an enanthem present on mucous membranes, is considered to be pathognomic for measles. It occurs 1-2 days before the rash to 1-2 days after the rash, and appears as punctate blue-white spots on the bright red background of the buccal mucosa. Though usually a mild or moderately severe Illness of childhood, measles can result in residual impairment from encephalitis in approxima tely 5-10 cases per 10,000 and in death in approximately 1-3 cases per 1000. 1 Complication such as otitis media, bronchopneumonia, laryngotr acheobronchitis (croup), and diarrhoea occur more commonly in young children under the age of 5 years. Pneumonia (6% of reported cases) may be viral or s uperimposed bacterial and is the most common cause of death. Complications such as pneumonia and acute encephalitis are increased in adults over the age of 20 years.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherHealth Protection Surveillance Centre (HPSC)en_GB
dc.subjectCOMMUNICABLE DISEASEen_GB
dc.subject.otherMEASLESen_GB
dc.titleGuidelines for control of measles in Irelanden_GB
dc.typeReporten
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