SARI Implementation: Gap analysis and future priorities March 2008

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/302958
Title:
SARI Implementation: Gap analysis and future priorities March 2008
Authors:
Health Protection Surveillance Centre (HPSC)
Publisher:
Health Protection Surveillance Centre (HPSC)
Issue Date:
Mar-2008
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/302958
Item Type:
Report
Language:
en
Description:
SARI Gap Analysis, March 2008 2 Introduction The Strategy for the control of Antimicrobial Resistance in Ireland (SARI) was launched by the Minister for Health and Children in 2001. Th e strategy was developed in response to the rising prevalence of antimicrobial resistanc e (AMR) in Ireland, as evidenced from data arising out of Ireland’s participation in the European Antimicrobial Resistance Surveillance System (EARSS), and in line with Europ ean Commission requirements for all EU member states to have a national strategy to address AMR. Following the launch of SARI, regional and national committees were esta blished to coordinate the implementation of the strategy, along with a number of sub-committees, to provide expert guidance on specific aspects of SARI. SARI was orig inally coordinated, and funded, by the Department of Health and Children (DoHC), with responsibility passing to the Health Services Executive (HSE) in 2005. In 2007 the HSE l aunched a national strategy for healthcare-associated infection (HCAI), which incor porates SARI. A gap analysis of SARI implementation was produced in 2005, which detailed progress with implementation of each of the recommendations in the strategy, identified gaps in implementation, and prioritised actions required to correct these gaps. This report is an update of the 2005 gap analysis, which takes into a ccount changes in the governance and role of SARI arising from the establishment of the HSE and the launch of the HSE’s HCAI strategy.
Keywords:
MICROBICIDE; INFECTION CONTROL

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorHealth Protection Surveillance Centre (HPSC)en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2013-10-08T08:27:18Z-
dc.date.available2013-10-08T08:27:18Z-
dc.date.issued2008-03-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/302958-
dc.descriptionSARI Gap Analysis, March 2008 2 Introduction The Strategy for the control of Antimicrobial Resistance in Ireland (SARI) was launched by the Minister for Health and Children in 2001. Th e strategy was developed in response to the rising prevalence of antimicrobial resistanc e (AMR) in Ireland, as evidenced from data arising out of Ireland’s participation in the European Antimicrobial Resistance Surveillance System (EARSS), and in line with Europ ean Commission requirements for all EU member states to have a national strategy to address AMR. Following the launch of SARI, regional and national committees were esta blished to coordinate the implementation of the strategy, along with a number of sub-committees, to provide expert guidance on specific aspects of SARI. SARI was orig inally coordinated, and funded, by the Department of Health and Children (DoHC), with responsibility passing to the Health Services Executive (HSE) in 2005. In 2007 the HSE l aunched a national strategy for healthcare-associated infection (HCAI), which incor porates SARI. A gap analysis of SARI implementation was produced in 2005, which detailed progress with implementation of each of the recommendations in the strategy, identified gaps in implementation, and prioritised actions required to correct these gaps. This report is an update of the 2005 gap analysis, which takes into a ccount changes in the governance and role of SARI arising from the establishment of the HSE and the launch of the HSE’s HCAI strategy.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherHealth Protection Surveillance Centre (HPSC)en_GB
dc.subjectMICROBICIDEen_GB
dc.subjectINFECTION CONTROLen_GB
dc.titleSARI Implementation: Gap analysis and future priorities March 2008en_GB
dc.typeReporten
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