Ultrasound-guided sacroiliac joint injection technique.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/302827
Title:
Ultrasound-guided sacroiliac joint injection technique.
Authors:
Harmon, Dominic; O'Sullivan, Michael
Affiliation:
Department of Anesthesia and Pain Medicine, Mid-Western Regional Hospital, Dooradoyle, Limerick, Ireland. dominic.harmon@hse.ie
Citation:
Ultrasound-guided sacroiliac joint injection technique., 11 (4):543-7 Pain Physician
Publisher:
Pain physician
Journal:
Pain physician
Issue Date:
Jul-2008
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/302827
PubMed ID:
18690282
Additional Links:
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18690282
Abstract:
We describe a case report and technique for using a portable ultrasound scanner and a curvilinear transducer (4-5MHz) (SonoSite Micromaxx SonoSite, Inc. 21919 30th Drive SE Bothwell W. A.) to guide sacroiliac joint (SIJ) injection. A 42-year-old male presented with chronic lower back pain centered on his left SIJ. His pain averaged 7 out of 10 (numerical rating scale). For the ultrasound-guided SIJ injection the patient was placed in the prone position. The ultrasound transducer was oriented in a transverse orientation at the level of the sacral hiatus. Here the sacral cornuae were identified. Moving the transducer laterally from here, the lateral edge of the sacrum was identified. This bony edge was followed in a cephalad direction with the transducer maintained in a transverse orientation. A second bony contour, the ileum, was identified. The cleft between both bony contours represented the sacroiliac joint. This was found at 4.5 cm depth. Real-time imaging was used to direct a 22G spinal needle into the SIJ, where solution was injected under direct vision. The patient's pain intensity decreased to a 2 out of 10 (numerical rating scale). Function improved and the patient was able to return to work. These improvements were maintained at 16 weeks. Ultrasound guidance does not expose patients and personnel to radiation and is readily accessible. Ultrasound-guided SIJ injections may have particular applications in the management of chronic lower back pain in certain clinical scenarios (e.g. pregnancy). Future studies to demonstrate efficacy and reproducibility are needed.
Item Type:
Article
Language:
en
MeSH:
Adult; Anesthetics, Local; Humans; Low Back Pain; Male; Sacroiliac Joint; Steroids; Transducers; Ultrasonography
ISSN:
1533-3159

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorHarmon, Dominicen_GB
dc.contributor.authorO'Sullivan, Michaelen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2013-10-07T11:47:25Z-
dc.date.available2013-10-07T11:47:25Z-
dc.date.issued2008-07-
dc.identifier.citationUltrasound-guided sacroiliac joint injection technique., 11 (4):543-7 Pain Physicianen_GB
dc.identifier.issn1533-3159-
dc.identifier.pmid18690282-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/302827-
dc.description.abstractWe describe a case report and technique for using a portable ultrasound scanner and a curvilinear transducer (4-5MHz) (SonoSite Micromaxx SonoSite, Inc. 21919 30th Drive SE Bothwell W. A.) to guide sacroiliac joint (SIJ) injection. A 42-year-old male presented with chronic lower back pain centered on his left SIJ. His pain averaged 7 out of 10 (numerical rating scale). For the ultrasound-guided SIJ injection the patient was placed in the prone position. The ultrasound transducer was oriented in a transverse orientation at the level of the sacral hiatus. Here the sacral cornuae were identified. Moving the transducer laterally from here, the lateral edge of the sacrum was identified. This bony edge was followed in a cephalad direction with the transducer maintained in a transverse orientation. A second bony contour, the ileum, was identified. The cleft between both bony contours represented the sacroiliac joint. This was found at 4.5 cm depth. Real-time imaging was used to direct a 22G spinal needle into the SIJ, where solution was injected under direct vision. The patient's pain intensity decreased to a 2 out of 10 (numerical rating scale). Function improved and the patient was able to return to work. These improvements were maintained at 16 weeks. Ultrasound guidance does not expose patients and personnel to radiation and is readily accessible. Ultrasound-guided SIJ injections may have particular applications in the management of chronic lower back pain in certain clinical scenarios (e.g. pregnancy). Future studies to demonstrate efficacy and reproducibility are needed.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherPain physicianen_GB
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18690282en_GB
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Pain physicianen_GB
dc.subject.meshAdult-
dc.subject.meshAnesthetics, Local-
dc.subject.meshHumans-
dc.subject.meshLow Back Pain-
dc.subject.meshMale-
dc.subject.meshSacroiliac Joint-
dc.subject.meshSteroids-
dc.subject.meshTransducers-
dc.subject.meshUltrasonography-
dc.titleUltrasound-guided sacroiliac joint injection technique.en_GB
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Anesthesia and Pain Medicine, Mid-Western Regional Hospital, Dooradoyle, Limerick, Ireland. dominic.harmon@hse.ieen_GB
dc.identifier.journalPain physicianen_GB
dc.description.fundingNo fundingen
dc.description.provinceMunsteren
dc.description.peer-reviewpeer-reviewen
All Items in Lenus, The Irish Health Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.