Cryptosporidiosis in the Isle of Thanet: an outbreak associated with local drinking water

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/302659
Title:
Cryptosporidiosis in the Isle of Thanet: an outbreak associated with local drinking water
Authors:
Joseph, C; Hamilton, G; O'Connor, M
Journal:
Epidemiology and Infection
Issue Date:
1991
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/302659
Additional Links:
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2272095/
Item Type:
Article
Language:
en
Description:
An outbreak of cryptosporidiosis occurred in the Isle of Thanet during December 1990 and January 1991. A total of 47 cases ranging in age from 2 months to 85 years were identified in residents from the Margate, Broadstairs and Ramsgate areas, with dates of onset of illness from 3 December to 14 January. A case-control study demonstrated a strong statistical association between illness and the consumption of unboiled tap water from a particular source, with evidence of a dose—response relationship. Although no cryptosporidial oocysts were identified in samples of untreated or treated water taken during the investigation, the results were consistent with the view that the source of infection was treated river water which was used to supplement borehole water.
Keywords:
EPIDEMIOLOGY; INFECTION CONTROL

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorJoseph, Cen_GB
dc.contributor.authorHamilton, Gen_GB
dc.contributor.authorO'Connor, Men_GB
dc.date.accessioned2013-10-03T14:15:14Z-
dc.date.available2013-10-03T14:15:14Z-
dc.date.issued1991-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/302659-
dc.descriptionAn outbreak of cryptosporidiosis occurred in the Isle of Thanet during December 1990 and January 1991. A total of 47 cases ranging in age from 2 months to 85 years were identified in residents from the Margate, Broadstairs and Ramsgate areas, with dates of onset of illness from 3 December to 14 January. A case-control study demonstrated a strong statistical association between illness and the consumption of unboiled tap water from a particular source, with evidence of a dose—response relationship. Although no cryptosporidial oocysts were identified in samples of untreated or treated water taken during the investigation, the results were consistent with the view that the source of infection was treated river water which was used to supplement borehole water.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2272095/en_GB
dc.subjectEPIDEMIOLOGYen_GB
dc.subjectINFECTION CONTROLen_GB
dc.titleCryptosporidiosis in the Isle of Thanet: an outbreak associated with local drinking wateren_GB
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalEpidemiology and Infectionen_GB
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