Pharmacoeconomic evaluation in Ireland: A review of the process

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/302606
Title:
Pharmacoeconomic evaluation in Ireland: A review of the process
Authors:
Tilson, Lesley; O’Leary, Aisling; Usher, Cara; Barry, Michael
Citation:
Pharmacoeconomics. 2010;28(4):307-22.
Publisher:
Pharmacoeconomics
Journal:
Pharmacoeconomics
Issue Date:
2010
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/302606
DOI:
10.2165/11318790-000000000-00000
Abstract:
The aim of this review is to describe the pharmacoeconomic assessment process in Ireland and to provide examples of recent appraisals and the subsequent impact on pricing and reimbursement decisions. Method: The pharmacoeconomic appraisals conducted by the National Centre for Pharmacoeconomics (NCPE) between September 2006 and February 2009 were reviewed. The NCPE recommendations and subsequent reimbursement decisions by the Health Service Executive (HSE) were recorded. Recommendations made by the NCPE were compared with those of UK agencies. The duration of the NCPE pharmacoeconomic process and the time from marketing authorisation to reimbursement was estimated. The budget impact assessments from the pharmaceutical companies were reviewed and compared for consistency. Results: The NCPE conducted twelve single technology appraisals during the study period. Eight of the medicines assessed were either recommended as a cost-effective use of resources or recommended with certain restrictions, and were funded by the HSE. Of the four medicines that were not considered cost-effective, two were reimbursed after a price reduction was negotiated and the remaining two were not reimbursed. The NCPE recommendations concurred with those of the UK agencies for the majority of appraisals, with the exception of sunitinib and lapatinib. The average duration of the NCPE process was 2.7 months. The average time from marketing authorisation to reimbursement was 7 months. The review of budget impact assessments highlighted a high degree of variability between submissions. Conclusions: The findings of this review demonstrate the efficiency of the pharmacoeconomic process and the acceptance of the NCPE recommendations by the HSE for pricing and reimbursement decisions. NCPE recommendations broadly concurred with those of UK agencies for the majority of appraisals.
Item Type:
Article
Language:
en
Keywords:
DRUG; PHARMACEUTICAL INDUSTRY; HEALTH ECONOMICS

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorTilson, Lesleyen_GB
dc.contributor.authorO’Leary, Aislingen_GB
dc.contributor.authorUsher, Caraen_GB
dc.contributor.authorBarry, Michaelen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2013-10-02T11:16:15Z-
dc.date.available2013-10-02T11:16:15Z-
dc.date.issued2010-
dc.identifier.citationPharmacoeconomics. 2010;28(4):307-22.en_GB
dc.identifier.doi10.2165/11318790-000000000-00000-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/302606-
dc.description.abstractThe aim of this review is to describe the pharmacoeconomic assessment process in Ireland and to provide examples of recent appraisals and the subsequent impact on pricing and reimbursement decisions. Method: The pharmacoeconomic appraisals conducted by the National Centre for Pharmacoeconomics (NCPE) between September 2006 and February 2009 were reviewed. The NCPE recommendations and subsequent reimbursement decisions by the Health Service Executive (HSE) were recorded. Recommendations made by the NCPE were compared with those of UK agencies. The duration of the NCPE pharmacoeconomic process and the time from marketing authorisation to reimbursement was estimated. The budget impact assessments from the pharmaceutical companies were reviewed and compared for consistency. Results: The NCPE conducted twelve single technology appraisals during the study period. Eight of the medicines assessed were either recommended as a cost-effective use of resources or recommended with certain restrictions, and were funded by the HSE. Of the four medicines that were not considered cost-effective, two were reimbursed after a price reduction was negotiated and the remaining two were not reimbursed. The NCPE recommendations concurred with those of the UK agencies for the majority of appraisals, with the exception of sunitinib and lapatinib. The average duration of the NCPE process was 2.7 months. The average time from marketing authorisation to reimbursement was 7 months. The review of budget impact assessments highlighted a high degree of variability between submissions. Conclusions: The findings of this review demonstrate the efficiency of the pharmacoeconomic process and the acceptance of the NCPE recommendations by the HSE for pricing and reimbursement decisions. NCPE recommendations broadly concurred with those of UK agencies for the majority of appraisals.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherPharmacoeconomicsen_GB
dc.subjectDRUGen_GB
dc.subjectPHARMACEUTICAL INDUSTRYen_GB
dc.subjectHEALTH ECONOMICSen_GB
dc.titlePharmacoeconomic evaluation in Ireland: A review of the processen_GB
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalPharmacoeconomicsen_GB
dc.description.fundingNo fundingen
dc.description.provinceLeinsteren
dc.description.peer-reviewpeer-reviewen
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