Lifestyle practices and the health promoting environment of hospital nurses.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/302589
Title:
Lifestyle practices and the health promoting environment of hospital nurses.
Authors:
Hope, A; Kelleher, C C; O'Connor, M
Affiliation:
Centre for Health Promotion Studies, National University of Ireland, Galway, Republic of Ireland.
Citation:
Lifestyle practices and the health promoting environment of hospital nurses. 1998, 28 (2):438-47 J Adv Nurs
Journal:
Journal of advanced nursing
Issue Date:
Aug-1998
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/302589
PubMed ID:
9725743
Abstract:
Lifestyle practices and the health promoting environment of hospital nurses This paper examined the lifestyle practices of hospital nurses and the impact of specific interventions in the hospital environment. The perception of nurse as health promoter and as carer of AIDS patients was also examined. A self-administered questionnaire was used to collect data at two different time periods. The sample represented 729 nurses (at pre- and post-time periods), both qualified and student nurses. Qualified nurses reported the highest stress levels while student nurses reported more negative lifestyle practices such as smoking, alcohol consumption and drug use. A greater number of current smokers (29%) consumed alcohol and used drugs than non-smokers. The impact of intervention strategies around compliance with smoking policy and work-site walk routes reduced exposure to passive smoking at work for qualified nurses and increased exercise participation for both groups of nurses. Workplace was identified as the main source of stress which included relationships at work and demands of the job. Hospital nurses experiencing high work stress were more likely to use professional support and personal coping (discuss problems with friends/family, have a good cry and eat more) than others. Nurses believed in the importance of health promotion as part of their work; however, qualified nurses felt more confident and gave more health related information than student nurses. Student nurses perceived a lower risk of contacting AIDS through work and a higher concern/worry in caring for AIDS patients than qualified nurses.
Item Type:
Article
Language:
en
Description:
Lifestyle practices and the health promoting environment of hospital nurses This paper examined the lifestyle practices of hospital nurses and the impact of specific interventions in the hospital environment. The perception of nurse as health promoter and as carer of AIDS patients was also examined. A self-administered questionnaire was used to collect data at two different time periods. The sample represented 729 nurses (at pre- and post-time periods), both qualified and student nurses. Qualified nurses reported the highest stress levels while student nurses reported more negative lifestyle practices such as smoking, alcohol consumption and drug use. A greater number of current smokers (29%) consumed alcohol and used drugs than non-smokers. The impact of intervention strategies around compliance with smoking policy and work-site walk routes reduced exposure to passive smoking at work for qualified nurses and increased exercise participation for both groups of nurses. Workplace was identified as the main source of stress which included relationships at work and demands of the job. Hospital nurses experiencing high work stress were more likely to use professional support and personal coping (discuss problems with friends/family, have a good cry and eat more) than others. Nurses believed in the importance of health promotion as part of their work; however, qualified nurses felt more confident and gave more health related information than student nurses. Student nurses perceived a lower risk of contacting AIDS through work and a higher concern/worry in caring for AIDS patients than qualified nurses.
Keywords:
HEALTH PROMOTION; NURSE; LIFESTYLE
MeSH:
Adaptation, Psychological; Adolescent; Adult; Burnout, Professional; Factor Analysis, Statistical; Female; Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice; Health Promotion; Humans; Life Style; Male; Nursing Staff, Hospital; Questionnaires; Self Care
ISSN:
0309-2402

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorHope, Aen_GB
dc.contributor.authorKelleher, C Cen_GB
dc.contributor.authorO'Connor, Men_GB
dc.date.accessioned2013-10-01T14:53:15Z-
dc.date.available2013-10-01T14:53:15Z-
dc.date.issued1998-08-
dc.identifier.citationLifestyle practices and the health promoting environment of hospital nurses. 1998, 28 (2):438-47 J Adv Nursen_GB
dc.identifier.issn0309-2402-
dc.identifier.pmid9725743-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/302589-
dc.descriptionLifestyle practices and the health promoting environment of hospital nurses This paper examined the lifestyle practices of hospital nurses and the impact of specific interventions in the hospital environment. The perception of nurse as health promoter and as carer of AIDS patients was also examined. A self-administered questionnaire was used to collect data at two different time periods. The sample represented 729 nurses (at pre- and post-time periods), both qualified and student nurses. Qualified nurses reported the highest stress levels while student nurses reported more negative lifestyle practices such as smoking, alcohol consumption and drug use. A greater number of current smokers (29%) consumed alcohol and used drugs than non-smokers. The impact of intervention strategies around compliance with smoking policy and work-site walk routes reduced exposure to passive smoking at work for qualified nurses and increased exercise participation for both groups of nurses. Workplace was identified as the main source of stress which included relationships at work and demands of the job. Hospital nurses experiencing high work stress were more likely to use professional support and personal coping (discuss problems with friends/family, have a good cry and eat more) than others. Nurses believed in the importance of health promotion as part of their work; however, qualified nurses felt more confident and gave more health related information than student nurses. Student nurses perceived a lower risk of contacting AIDS through work and a higher concern/worry in caring for AIDS patients than qualified nurses.en_GB
dc.description.abstractLifestyle practices and the health promoting environment of hospital nurses This paper examined the lifestyle practices of hospital nurses and the impact of specific interventions in the hospital environment. The perception of nurse as health promoter and as carer of AIDS patients was also examined. A self-administered questionnaire was used to collect data at two different time periods. The sample represented 729 nurses (at pre- and post-time periods), both qualified and student nurses. Qualified nurses reported the highest stress levels while student nurses reported more negative lifestyle practices such as smoking, alcohol consumption and drug use. A greater number of current smokers (29%) consumed alcohol and used drugs than non-smokers. The impact of intervention strategies around compliance with smoking policy and work-site walk routes reduced exposure to passive smoking at work for qualified nurses and increased exercise participation for both groups of nurses. Workplace was identified as the main source of stress which included relationships at work and demands of the job. Hospital nurses experiencing high work stress were more likely to use professional support and personal coping (discuss problems with friends/family, have a good cry and eat more) than others. Nurses believed in the importance of health promotion as part of their work; however, qualified nurses felt more confident and gave more health related information than student nurses. Student nurses perceived a lower risk of contacting AIDS through work and a higher concern/worry in caring for AIDS patients than qualified nurses.-
dc.language.isoenen
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Journal of advanced nursingen_GB
dc.subjectHEALTH PROMOTIONen_GB
dc.subjectNURSEen_GB
dc.subjectLIFESTYLEen_GB
dc.subject.meshAdaptation, Psychological-
dc.subject.meshAdolescent-
dc.subject.meshAdult-
dc.subject.meshBurnout, Professional-
dc.subject.meshFactor Analysis, Statistical-
dc.subject.meshFemale-
dc.subject.meshHealth Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice-
dc.subject.meshHealth Promotion-
dc.subject.meshHumans-
dc.subject.meshLife Style-
dc.subject.meshMale-
dc.subject.meshNursing Staff, Hospital-
dc.subject.meshQuestionnaires-
dc.subject.meshSelf Care-
dc.titleLifestyle practices and the health promoting environment of hospital nurses.en_GB
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentCentre for Health Promotion Studies, National University of Ireland, Galway, Republic of Ireland.en_GB
dc.identifier.journalJournal of advanced nursingen_GB
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