Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/302584
Title:
Ten-year survival of Down syndrome births.
Authors:
Hayes, C; Johnson, Z; Thornton, L; Fogarty, J; Lyons, R; O'Connor, M; Delany, V; Buckley, K
Affiliation:
Health Information Unit, Eastern Health Board, Dr Steevens Hospital, Dublin, Ireland.
Citation:
Ten-year survival of Down syndrome births. 1997, 26 (4):822-9 Int J Epidemiol
Journal:
International journal of epidemiology
Issue Date:
Aug-1997
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/302584
PubMed ID:
9279615
Abstract:
To determine the survival status of children with Down syndrome (DS), and to document factors influencing survival.; Follow-up study of cases identified from the Dublin European Register of Congenital Anomalies and Twins (EUROCAT) Register. Follow-up was attempted for each case until death or 1992 or until the date last known to be alive.; Eastern Health Board, Dublin.; In all, 389 DS children, born between 1 January 1980 and 31 December 1989 were followed up.; Survival rates of 88% at one year and 82% at 10 years were found. There was a non-significant improvement in survival between the cohort born in 1980-1984 and that born in 1985-1989. Congenital heart defects reduced survival to 72% and complete atrio-ventricular canal defects (CAVD) had the poorest prognosis (58% survival at 10 years). Cases with CAVD showed a trend towards improved survival when surgically treated. Maternal age mother's county of residence, sex of infant, season of birth and presence of additional non-cardiac congenital anomalies had no impact on survival.; Four out of five DS children now survive at least 10 years. Adequate educational and health service provision needs to be made for them, especially those with congenital heart defects. The need for studies which compare survival and quality of life in DS children with CAVD who undergo cardiac surgery versus those who do not, taking account of various selection factors, is identified.
Item Type:
Article
Language:
en
Keywords:
DOWNS SYNDROME
Local subject classification:
PUBLIC HEALTH DEPARTMENT; CONGENITAL ANOMALY; HEALTH IMPROVEMENT
MeSH:
Child; Child, Preschool; Down Syndrome; Female; Follow-Up Studies; Heart Defects, Congenital; Humans; Infant; Infant, Newborn; Life Expectancy; Male; Prognosis; Survivors
ISSN:
0300-5771

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorHayes, Cen_GB
dc.contributor.authorJohnson, Zen_GB
dc.contributor.authorThornton, Len_GB
dc.contributor.authorFogarty, Jen_GB
dc.contributor.authorLyons, Ren_GB
dc.contributor.authorO'Connor, Men_GB
dc.contributor.authorDelany, Ven_GB
dc.contributor.authorBuckley, Ken_GB
dc.date.accessioned2013-10-01T13:45:42Zen
dc.date.available2013-10-01T13:45:42Zen
dc.date.issued1997-08en
dc.identifier.citationTen-year survival of Down syndrome births. 1997, 26 (4):822-9 Int J Epidemiolen_GB
dc.identifier.issn0300-5771en
dc.identifier.pmid9279615en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/302584en
dc.description.abstractTo determine the survival status of children with Down syndrome (DS), and to document factors influencing survival.en
dc.description.abstractFollow-up study of cases identified from the Dublin European Register of Congenital Anomalies and Twins (EUROCAT) Register. Follow-up was attempted for each case until death or 1992 or until the date last known to be alive.en
dc.description.abstractEastern Health Board, Dublin.en
dc.description.abstractIn all, 389 DS children, born between 1 January 1980 and 31 December 1989 were followed up.en
dc.description.abstractSurvival rates of 88% at one year and 82% at 10 years were found. There was a non-significant improvement in survival between the cohort born in 1980-1984 and that born in 1985-1989. Congenital heart defects reduced survival to 72% and complete atrio-ventricular canal defects (CAVD) had the poorest prognosis (58% survival at 10 years). Cases with CAVD showed a trend towards improved survival when surgically treated. Maternal age mother's county of residence, sex of infant, season of birth and presence of additional non-cardiac congenital anomalies had no impact on survival.en
dc.description.abstractFour out of five DS children now survive at least 10 years. Adequate educational and health service provision needs to be made for them, especially those with congenital heart defects. The need for studies which compare survival and quality of life in DS children with CAVD who undergo cardiac surgery versus those who do not, taking account of various selection factors, is identified.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to International journal of epidemiologyen_GB
dc.subjectDOWNS SYNDROMEen_GB
dc.subject.meshChilden
dc.subject.meshChild, Preschoolen
dc.subject.meshDown Syndromeen
dc.subject.meshFemaleen
dc.subject.meshFollow-Up Studiesen
dc.subject.meshHeart Defects, Congenitalen
dc.subject.meshHumansen
dc.subject.meshInfanten
dc.subject.meshInfant, Newbornen
dc.subject.meshLife Expectancyen
dc.subject.meshMaleen
dc.subject.meshPrognosisen
dc.subject.meshSurvivorsen
dc.subject.otherPUBLIC HEALTH DEPARTMENTen
dc.subject.otherCONGENITAL ANOMALYen
dc.subject.otherHEALTH IMPROVEMENTen
dc.titleTen-year survival of Down syndrome births.en_GB
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentHealth Information Unit, Eastern Health Board, Dr Steevens Hospital, Dublin, Ireland.en_GB
dc.identifier.journalInternational journal of epidemiologyen_GB

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