Do doctors benefit from their profession?--A survey of medical practitioners' health promotion and health safety practices.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/302568
Title:
Do doctors benefit from their profession?--A survey of medical practitioners' health promotion and health safety practices.
Authors:
O'Connor, M; Kelleher, C
Affiliation:
Dept. of Health Promotion, National University of Ireland, Galway.
Citation:
Do doctors benefit from their profession?--A survey of medical practitioners' health promotion and health safety practices. 1998, 91 (6):206-9 Ir Med J
Journal:
Irish medical journal
Issue Date:
Dec-1998
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/302568
PubMed ID:
10069130
Abstract:
Three hundred Irish Medical Organisation members were surveyed on health promotion and health and safety issues. 64.7% responded (65.3 males; 33.7% < thirty-five years). Over half (54.9%) were aware of the safety legislation and very few reported available occupational health services. A majority wanted more such services. Nearly all believed health promotion was important yet only 35.2% always availed of opportunities to give such advice. 36.3% were often stressed, particularly at work. Alcohol was sometimes or frequently used to cope by around half of respondents. Although less than half (47.7%) used whole milk, one third usually or always added salt to their food. 15.5% took no weekly aerobic exercise but 42.0% claimed to do so three times weekly. 11.4 were current smokers. A third of women had never had a cervical smear. We conclude doctors require adequate occupational health services.
Item Type:
Article
Language:
en
Description:
Three hundred Irish Medical Organisation members were surveyed on health promotion and health and safety issues. 64.7% responded (65.3 males; 33.7% < thirty-five years). Over half (54.9%) were aware of the safety legislation and very few reported available occupational health services. A majority wanted more such services. Nearly all believed health promotion was important yet only 35.2% always availed of opportunities to give such advice. 36.3% were often stressed, particularly at work. Alcohol was sometimes or frequently used to cope by around half of respondents. Although less than half (47.7%) used whole milk, one third usually or always added salt to their food. 15.5% took no weekly aerobic exercise but 42.0% claimed to do so three times weekly. 11.4 were current smokers. A third of women had never had a cervical smear. We conclude doctors require adequate occupational health services.
Keywords:
OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH AND SAFETY; DOCTORS
MeSH:
Adult; Aged; Alcohol Drinking; Cross-Sectional Studies; Female; Health Promotion; Health Surveys; Humans; Ireland; Life Style; Male; Middle Aged; Occupational Health; Safety; Smoking; Stress, Psychological
ISSN:
0332-3102

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorO'Connor, Men_GB
dc.contributor.authorKelleher, Cen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2013-10-01T14:53:50Z-
dc.date.available2013-10-01T14:53:50Z-
dc.date.issued1998-12-
dc.identifier.citationDo doctors benefit from their profession?--A survey of medical practitioners' health promotion and health safety practices. 1998, 91 (6):206-9 Ir Med Jen_GB
dc.identifier.issn0332-3102-
dc.identifier.pmid10069130-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/302568-
dc.descriptionThree hundred Irish Medical Organisation members were surveyed on health promotion and health and safety issues. 64.7% responded (65.3 males; 33.7% < thirty-five years). Over half (54.9%) were aware of the safety legislation and very few reported available occupational health services. A majority wanted more such services. Nearly all believed health promotion was important yet only 35.2% always availed of opportunities to give such advice. 36.3% were often stressed, particularly at work. Alcohol was sometimes or frequently used to cope by around half of respondents. Although less than half (47.7%) used whole milk, one third usually or always added salt to their food. 15.5% took no weekly aerobic exercise but 42.0% claimed to do so three times weekly. 11.4 were current smokers. A third of women had never had a cervical smear. We conclude doctors require adequate occupational health services.en_GB
dc.description.abstractThree hundred Irish Medical Organisation members were surveyed on health promotion and health and safety issues. 64.7% responded (65.3 males; 33.7% < thirty-five years). Over half (54.9%) were aware of the safety legislation and very few reported available occupational health services. A majority wanted more such services. Nearly all believed health promotion was important yet only 35.2% always availed of opportunities to give such advice. 36.3% were often stressed, particularly at work. Alcohol was sometimes or frequently used to cope by around half of respondents. Although less than half (47.7%) used whole milk, one third usually or always added salt to their food. 15.5% took no weekly aerobic exercise but 42.0% claimed to do so three times weekly. 11.4 were current smokers. A third of women had never had a cervical smear. We conclude doctors require adequate occupational health services.-
dc.language.isoenen
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Irish medical journalen_GB
dc.subjectOCCUPATIONAL HEALTH AND SAFETYen_GB
dc.subjectDOCTORSen_GB
dc.subject.meshAdult-
dc.subject.meshAged-
dc.subject.meshAlcohol Drinking-
dc.subject.meshCross-Sectional Studies-
dc.subject.meshFemale-
dc.subject.meshHealth Promotion-
dc.subject.meshHealth Surveys-
dc.subject.meshHumans-
dc.subject.meshIreland-
dc.subject.meshLife Style-
dc.subject.meshMale-
dc.subject.meshMiddle Aged-
dc.subject.meshOccupational Health-
dc.subject.meshSafety-
dc.subject.meshSmoking-
dc.subject.meshStress, Psychological-
dc.titleDo doctors benefit from their profession?--A survey of medical practitioners' health promotion and health safety practices.en_GB
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentDept. of Health Promotion, National University of Ireland, Galway.en_GB
dc.identifier.journalIrish medical journalen_GB

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