Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/302567
Title:
School nutrition survey.
Authors:
O'Connor, M; Kiely, D; Mulvihill, M; Winters, A; Bollard, C; Hamilton, A; Corrigan, C; Moore, E
Affiliation:
Community Care, Mullingar Co Westmeath.
Citation:
School nutrition survey. 1993, 86 (3):89-91 Ir Med J
Journal:
Irish medical journal
Issue Date:
May-1993
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/302567
PubMed ID:
8567245
Abstract:
Food we eat has an important influence on health and well-being. Many eating habits are established in childhood. 456 children aged eight to 12 years participated in this survey of food eaten at school. Of all the food items eaten as a snack, 48.6% were categorised as junk. 75.8% of the sandwiches brought to school for lunch were made with white bread. Of the remaining food items brought for lunch 63.5% were of the junk variety. Compared with those who brought a snack or lunch from home, those given money to buy their own were more likely to eat junk (p < 0.01). Food eaten at school reflects approximately one third of a child's daily food intake but health food practises for even a third of food intake may be of a value for health and long term eating habits. Nutritional education with the reinforcement of high nutritional standards in schools could improve the situation.
Item Type:
Article
Language:
en
Keywords:
NUTRITION EDUCATION; NUTRITION; SCHOOL
MeSH:
Child; Female; Food Services; Humans; Ireland; Male; Nutrition Surveys; Nutritional Requirements; Schools
ISSN:
0332-3102

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorO'Connor, Men_GB
dc.contributor.authorKiely, Den_GB
dc.contributor.authorMulvihill, Men_GB
dc.contributor.authorWinters, Aen_GB
dc.contributor.authorBollard, Cen_GB
dc.contributor.authorHamilton, Aen_GB
dc.contributor.authorCorrigan, Cen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMoore, Een_GB
dc.date.accessioned2013-10-01T13:41:03Z-
dc.date.available2013-10-01T13:41:03Z-
dc.date.issued1993-05-
dc.identifier.citationSchool nutrition survey. 1993, 86 (3):89-91 Ir Med Jen_GB
dc.identifier.issn0332-3102-
dc.identifier.pmid8567245-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/302567-
dc.description.abstractFood we eat has an important influence on health and well-being. Many eating habits are established in childhood. 456 children aged eight to 12 years participated in this survey of food eaten at school. Of all the food items eaten as a snack, 48.6% were categorised as junk. 75.8% of the sandwiches brought to school for lunch were made with white bread. Of the remaining food items brought for lunch 63.5% were of the junk variety. Compared with those who brought a snack or lunch from home, those given money to buy their own were more likely to eat junk (p < 0.01). Food eaten at school reflects approximately one third of a child's daily food intake but health food practises for even a third of food intake may be of a value for health and long term eating habits. Nutritional education with the reinforcement of high nutritional standards in schools could improve the situation.-
dc.language.isoenen
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Irish medical journalen_GB
dc.subjectNUTRITION EDUCATIONen_GB
dc.subjectNUTRITIONen_GB
dc.subjectSCHOOLen_GB
dc.subject.meshChild-
dc.subject.meshFemale-
dc.subject.meshFood Services-
dc.subject.meshHumans-
dc.subject.meshIreland-
dc.subject.meshMale-
dc.subject.meshNutrition Surveys-
dc.subject.meshNutritional Requirements-
dc.subject.meshSchools-
dc.titleSchool nutrition survey.en_GB
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentCommunity Care, Mullingar Co Westmeath.en_GB
dc.identifier.journalIrish medical journalen_GB
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