Clinical research ethics in Irish healthcare: diversity, dynamism and medicalization.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/302408
Title:
Clinical research ethics in Irish healthcare: diversity, dynamism and medicalization.
Authors:
Condell, Sarah L; Begley, Cecily
Affiliation:
Dr Steevens' Hospital, Ireland. sarah.condell@hse.ie
Citation:
Clinical research ethics in Irish healthcare: diversity, dynamism and medicalization. 2012, 19 (6):810-8 Nurs Ethics
Publisher:
Nursing ethics
Journal:
Nursing ethics
Issue Date:
Nov-2012
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/302408
DOI:
10.1177/0969733011431191
PubMed ID:
22691601
Additional Links:
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/?term=Clinical+research+ethics+in+Irish+healthcare%3A+diversity%2C+dynamism+and+medicalization
Abstract:
Gaining ethical clearance to conduct a study is an important aspect of all research involving humans but can be time-consuming and daunting for novice researchers. This article stems from a larger ethnographic study that examined research capacity building in Irish nursing and midwifery. Data were collected over a 28-month time frame from a purposive sample of 16 nurse or midwife research fellows who were funded to undertake full-time PhDs. Gaining ethical clearance for their studies was reported as an early 'rite of passage' in the category of 'labouring the doctorate'. This article penetrates the complexities in Irish clinical research ethics by describing the practices these nurse and midwife researchers encountered and the experiences they had. The key issue of representation that occurred in the context of 'medicalized' research ethics is further explored including its meaning for nursing or midwifery research.
Item Type:
Article
Language:
en
Description:
Gaining ethical clearance to conduct a study is an important aspect of all research involving humans but can be time-consuming and daunting for novice researchers. This article stems from a larger ethnographic study that examined research capacity building in Irish nursing and midwifery. Data were collected over a 28-month time frame from a purposive sample of 16 nurse or midwife research fellows who were funded to undertake full-time PhDs. Gaining ethical clearance for their studies was reported as an early 'rite of passage' in the category of 'labouring the doctorate'. This article penetrates the complexities in Irish clinical research ethics by describing the practices these nurse and midwife researchers encountered and the experiences they had. The key issue of representation that occurred in the context of 'medicalized' research ethics is further explored including its meaning for nursing or midwifery research.
MeSH:
Anthropology, Cultural; Capacity Building; Clinical Nursing Research; Delivery of Health Care; Female; Humans; Ireland; Longitudinal Studies; Medicalization; Midwifery; Pregnancy
ISSN:
1477-0989

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorCondell, Sarah Len_GB
dc.contributor.authorBegley, Cecilyen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2013-09-27T11:06:02Z-
dc.date.available2013-09-27T11:06:02Z-
dc.date.issued2012-11-
dc.identifier.citationClinical research ethics in Irish healthcare: diversity, dynamism and medicalization. 2012, 19 (6):810-8 Nurs Ethicsen_GB
dc.identifier.issn1477-0989-
dc.identifier.pmid22691601-
dc.identifier.doi10.1177/0969733011431191-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/302408-
dc.descriptionGaining ethical clearance to conduct a study is an important aspect of all research involving humans but can be time-consuming and daunting for novice researchers. This article stems from a larger ethnographic study that examined research capacity building in Irish nursing and midwifery. Data were collected over a 28-month time frame from a purposive sample of 16 nurse or midwife research fellows who were funded to undertake full-time PhDs. Gaining ethical clearance for their studies was reported as an early 'rite of passage' in the category of 'labouring the doctorate'. This article penetrates the complexities in Irish clinical research ethics by describing the practices these nurse and midwife researchers encountered and the experiences they had. The key issue of representation that occurred in the context of 'medicalized' research ethics is further explored including its meaning for nursing or midwifery research.en_GB
dc.description.abstractGaining ethical clearance to conduct a study is an important aspect of all research involving humans but can be time-consuming and daunting for novice researchers. This article stems from a larger ethnographic study that examined research capacity building in Irish nursing and midwifery. Data were collected over a 28-month time frame from a purposive sample of 16 nurse or midwife research fellows who were funded to undertake full-time PhDs. Gaining ethical clearance for their studies was reported as an early 'rite of passage' in the category of 'labouring the doctorate'. This article penetrates the complexities in Irish clinical research ethics by describing the practices these nurse and midwife researchers encountered and the experiences they had. The key issue of representation that occurred in the context of 'medicalized' research ethics is further explored including its meaning for nursing or midwifery research.-
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherNursing ethicsen_GB
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/?term=Clinical+research+ethics+in+Irish+healthcare%3A+diversity%2C+dynamism+and+medicalizationen_GB
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Nursing ethicsen_GB
dc.subject.meshAnthropology, Cultural-
dc.subject.meshCapacity Building-
dc.subject.meshClinical Nursing Research-
dc.subject.meshDelivery of Health Care-
dc.subject.meshFemale-
dc.subject.meshHumans-
dc.subject.meshIreland-
dc.subject.meshLongitudinal Studies-
dc.subject.meshMedicalization-
dc.subject.meshMidwifery-
dc.subject.meshPregnancy-
dc.titleClinical research ethics in Irish healthcare: diversity, dynamism and medicalization.en_GB
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentDr Steevens' Hospital, Ireland. sarah.condell@hse.ieen_GB
dc.identifier.journalNursing ethicsen_GB

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